May 14, 2021  
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 
    
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Listings


 

Details of Courses

Courses taught at the University of Alberta are listed alphabetically. All courses, except those taught by Faculté Saint-Jean, are described in English.

Each course is designated by its computer abbreviation and a number. Students should use this abbreviation and number when completing any form requiring this information.

Courses are numbered according to the following system:

000-099 Pre-University
100-199 Basic Undergraduate. Normally requires no university-level prerequisites. Designed typically for students in the first year of a program.
200-299 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 100-level. Designed typically for students in the second year of a program.
300-399 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 200-level. Designed typically for students in the third year of a program.
400-499 Advanced Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 300-level. Designed typically for students in the fourth year of a program.
500-599 Graduate. Designated for graduate students and certain advanced or honors undergraduate students in their final year.
600-799 Graduate Courses
800-899 Special Registrations
900-999 Graduate Thesis and Project Numbers

For the purposes of program descriptions and prerequisite designation, courses numbered 100-199 are designated as Junior Courses and courses numbered 200-499 are designated as Senior Courses.

Note: Some exceptions to the course number system described above have been granted to the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.

Course Description Symbols and Figures

Several symbols and figures are used to indicate the type, duration, and weight of courses.

  1. ★—Indicates “units of course weight,” and usually follows the course title. The accompanying number indicates the weight of the course as used in computing grade point averages and for meeting degree requirements.
    A course which runs throughout the Fall/Winter (i.e., from September through April) is usually weighted ★6. A course that runs for only one term (i.e., Fall: from September to December, or Winter: from January through April) is usually weighted ★3. Certain courses are offered over Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer, or in one term, with weights of ★1, ★2, and ★4. These are considered as one-sixth, one-third, and two-thirds of a Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer course, respectively. Some honors and graduate courses involving research may vary in weight according to the length and difficulty of the project. Some clinical courses may vary in weight according to the length of clinical experience. Some courses, not included in the computation of grade point averages, are offered for credit only and either carry a weight of ★0, or are marked as “Credit.”
    Undergraduate students who take courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering but are not registered in Engineering will have a course weight assigned for these courses according to the protocol of their home Faculty.
  2. fi—Denotes: “fee index,” the value used to calculate the instructional fees for each course. The fee index is multiplied by the fee index value (given in the appropriate subsection of Fees Payment Guide ) to give the dollar value of instructional fees for the course.
    For normal courses, the fee index is twice the value of the units of course weight; for example, a course with ★3 normally has fi 6. In cases where exceptional fees considerations need to be made, the fee index is set differently by the Board of Governors.
    Note that certain programs (e.g., MD, DDS, etc.) are assessed on a program fee basis for all or certain years. In these cases, the fee index calculation does not apply.
  3. (x term, a-b-c)—These figures in parentheses give information on when the course is offered and the hours of instruction required by the course in a week, or in some cases the total time in a term.
    In the case of a single-term course, the term in which the course is given is mentioned (item x). The designation “either term” means that the course may be offered either in the first term or in the second term or in each term, at the discretion of the department concerned. The designation “variable” means that the course may be taught either as a single-term or as a full-session course.
    Item a indicates lecture hours. Item b indicates seminar hour(s), demonstration hours (d), clinic hours (c), or lecture-laboratory hours (L). Item c indicates laboratory hours. For two-term courses, the hours of instruction are the same in both terms unless otherwise indicated. The expression 3/2 means 3 hours of instruction every second week; 2s/2 means 2 seminar hours every second week.
    Examples:
    (first term, 3-0-3): a course taught in first term with 3 hours lecture, no seminar, and 3 hours lab per week.
    (second term, 0-1s-2): a course taught in second term with no lectures, 1 seminar hour, and 2 hours of lab per week.
    (either term, 3-0-0): a course taught in either first or second term, or each term, with 3 lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
    (two-term, 3-0-3): a course taught over both first and second term with three lecture hours, no seminar, and three hours lab per week.
    (variable, 3-0-0): a course which may be taught in either first or second term or over two terms with three lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
  4. Prerequisite—This provides information on courses which must be successfully completed before registering in the more advanced course.
    Corequisite—This provides information on courses which must be taken before or at the same time as the course described in the listing.
    Note: Departments are authorized to cancel the registration of those students registered in a course offered by the department if they do not meet the prerequisite and/or corequisite requirements stated in the course description in this Calendar.
  5. [Department]— This indicates the department responsible for registration for interdepartmental courses. Normally, courses will be credited to the discipline listed in the square brackets.
  6. Open Studies Courses—Courses that are available to Open Studies students are designated in Bear Tracks Course Catalog by the  symbol.  indicates that a course is available to Open Studies students on a delayed registration basis only (see Registration  for complete details).  To browse courses that have been approved for Open Studies students, see Open Studies Course Listings on the Office of the Registrar website.
Important: Registration Procedures for Two-Term Courses

Students are strongly advised to refer to the Registration and Courses menu at www.registrarsoffice.ualberta.ca for details. Two-term courses are normally offered over two terms (either Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer). In a few instances, two-term courses are offered within a single term. In all cases these are identifiable in the Class Schedule because they consist of part A and part B (e.g., English 111A and 111B).

To successfully register in a two-term course, students, must do the following:

  • Register in both the part A and part B for all types of sections offered (Lectures, Labs, Seminars, etc.);
  • Register in the same section numbers for part A and part B of a course (e.g., Lecture A1 for both part A and part B, and Lab E3 for both part A and part B);
  • Register in all the appropriate sections on the same day.

All of the above must be done or the course registration is invalid and will be deleted. Invalid registrations will be deleted nightly. It is the student’s responsibility to attempt the course registration again, subject to availability.

Example: A student wishes to register in ABCD 101, a two-term course. It has a lecture and a lab section. Based on the student’s timetable planning, decides to take Lecture C3 and Lab C8. The student must add

In Fall Term ABCD 101A Lec C3 and ABCD 101A Lab C8,
and  
In Winter Term ABCD 101B Lec C3 and ABCD 101B Lab C8.

All these sections must be added on the same day to successfully register. Otherwise the registration in ABCD 101 will be deleted overnight and the student’s place in the course will be lost.

Course Renumbering

Over the years many courses have been renumbered. Old numbers can be found within individual course listings of previous Calendar editions.

Courses on Reserve

Courses not offered in the past four years are removed from this Calendar and placed on Reserve. These courses may be taught again in the future, in which case they would be brought back into the active Course Listings and placed in the Calendar. Information about Reserve Courses is available through the Registrar’s Office, the University Secretariat, and Faculty Offices.

Faculty Specific Regulations Regarding Courses

For specific Faculty regulations relating to courses and for a complete list of subjects taught by a Faculty, please consult the Undergraduate Programs section of the Calendar at the end of each Faculty section.

Physical Requirements for University Courses

The University has a commitment to the education of all academically qualified students and special services are frequently provided on campus to assist disabled students.

Nevertheless, some courses make certain unavoidable demands on students with respect to the possession of a certain level of physical skill or ability if the academic objectives of the course are to be realized. In case of doubt, students are advised to contact the Department concerned and Student Accessibility Disability Services (SAS), Office of the Dean of Students.

Because support services cannot be guaranteed for all off-campus courses, instructors may be obliged to refuse registration in such courses.

Course Availability

The following is a comprehensive course listing of all the approved courses that the University of Alberta may offer. The appearance of a course in this list does not guarantee that the course will actually be offered. The most current information on courses is available on Bear Tracks at https://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca

Course Listings

 

Augustana Faculty - Economics: Undergraduate

Department of Social Sciences
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUECO 254 - India Tour


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable) Three-week study tour of India that focuses on a chosen region of India in order to examine the intersection between religious belief and practice and development challenges. Students will be exposed to various development projects as well as an array of religious sites. It is expected that students will gain an in depth understanding of India, its cultural and religious diversity, and the challenges it faces in the 21st century. Students will be exposed to both rural and urban life. Prerequisite: AUECO 252 or AUREL 260. Notes: Costs associated with this India Tour course and applicable tuition are the responsibility of the students. Enrolment is limited to 15 students. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 254 and AUREL 266. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUECO 257 - The International Economy in Historical Perspective I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Economic analysis of modern economic growth focusing on the Industrial Revolution and its consequences. Critical thinking about why the Industrial Revolution and its related economic growth models can and/or cannot be generalized worldwide is also encouraged.
  
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    AUECO 258 - The International Economy in Historical Perspective II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Economic analysis of the international economy during the past century. Topics examined include the disintegration of national and international economies after World War I, the Great Depression, and the fate of national and international economies after World War II. Critical thinking about whether international economic integration has promoted worldwide economic growth and stability is also encouraged.
  
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    AUECO 311 - Introductory Econometrics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1) Introduction to the application of econometric methods in economics and business. The focus is on major topics in econometrics with emphasis on applied regression methods. Prerequisites: AUSTA 153 and AUECO 203.
  
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    AUECO 333 - Money and Banking in Canada


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of the role of money and of monetary institutions and policy in the framework of Canadian financial institutions. Prerequisite: AUECO 101 and 102.
  
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    AUECO 336 - Economics of Financial Markets


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of economic approaches to financial market activity: the meaning and measurement of risk, portfolio investment choices and market equilibrium, theory of interest and the term structure of interest rates, inter-temporal and macro-policy issues, and debt management. Prerequisite: AUECO 101 and 102. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 336 and AUECO 436.
  
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    AUECO 341 - Environmental Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the relationships between the economy and the environment. Emphasis is placed on the application of economic analysis to various environmental issues. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 341 and AUENV 341.
  
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    AUECO 346 - Agricultural Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of economic theory and policy relating to the agricultural sector of the economy. Emphasis is placed on the economic aspects of agricultural production, marketing, finance, and resource use with particular reference to agricultural policy in Canada and Alberta. Prerequisite: AUECO 101.
  
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    AUECO 356 - China Tour: Experiencing Development and Change


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (variable, variable) A three week study trip to China, including travel to educational institutions in Zhuhai, the Zhuhai Special Economic Zone and other locations depending on the year. Through lectures, tours and research taking place in China, this course explores the effects of economic and institutional reforms as well as those of globalization, with links to China's history and to its culture. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 356 and AUPOL 356.
  
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    AUECO 360 - International Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the theories of international trade and investment, the international monetary system, and the multinational firm. Prerequisite: AUECO 101.
  
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    AUECO 363 - International Finance


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the types of international transactions, exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, macroeconomics in an open economy, and other issues in the international monetary system. Prerequisite: AUECO 102. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 363 and AUECO 463.
  
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    AUECO 364 - Development Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of the major approaches to and problems of economic development in the less-developed nations. Particular emphasis is placed on issues relating to capital accumulation, income distribution, population growth and employment, and international economic relations. Prerequisite: AUECO 101.
  
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    AUECO 380 - Selected Topics in Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course covers selected topics in Economics. Topics may vary from year to year depending on the instructor and student interest. Prerequisites: AUECO 101 and 102. Notes: Minimum third year standing.
  
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    AUECO 382 - Strategic Planning and Decision-making


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course provides a holistic understanding of business strategy and competitive dynamics using a computer-based business simulation. Participants will make decisions in a variety of business areas including product placement, sales forecasting, marketing, finance, and labour relations. Prerequisites: 3rd year standing MGT or ECO major or minor, *3 in a senior level AUMGT or AUECO.
  
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    AUECO 384 - Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Designed for majors in Economics, dealing with extensions and applications of microeconomic theory: topics include intertemporal choice, risk, uncertainty and expected utility; oligopoly and game theory; externalities, public goods, adverse selection, moral hazard, and asymmetric information; general equilibrium. Prerequisites: AUECO 203 and AUMAT 110 or 116.
  
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    AUECO 385 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Designed for majors in Economics. Theories of stabilization policy; expectations; the government budget constraint; inflation and unemployment; business cycles and growth; theories of aggregate consumption, investment, money demand and money supply. Prerequisites: AUECO 203, 204 and AUMAT 110 or 116.
  
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    AUECO 390 - Economics Internship


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (variable, 0-3s-0) Students choose either the winter term (in their 3rd /4th year) or the spring/summer term (at the end of 3rd year) to spend time working full or part time outside the University. This course offers students an opportunity to apply economic analysis in real world setting. Prerequisites: At least *9 at a senior level in economics and consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUECO 393 - Public Sector Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Analysis of the use of resources for public purposes by all levels of government, emphasizing the rationale for public expenditures, taxation structures, and public choice mechanisms. Prerequisite: AUECO 102.
  
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    AUECO 397 - Directed Reading I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of economics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in economics.
  
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    AUECO 398 - Directed Reading II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of economics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUECO 397 or 497, and consent of the instructor. Notes: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in economics.
  
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    AUECO 436 - Economics of Financial Markets


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of economic approaches to financial market activity: the meaning and measurement of risk, portfolio investment choices and market equilibrium, theory of interest and the term structure of interest rates, inter-temporal and macro-policy issues, and debt management. Prerequisite: AUECO 101 and 102. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 336 and AUECO 436.
  
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    AUECO 449 - Economic Methods of Project Evaluation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Analysis of investment projects using various economic methods. Topics include the use of cost-benefit analysis, impact analysis, and methods to examine the relations among economic activity, the environment, and development. Prerequisites: AUECO 203 and 204.
  
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    AUECO 463 - International Finance


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the types of international transactions, exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, macroeconomics in an open economy, and other issues in the international monetary system. Prerequisite: AUECO 102. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 363 and AUECO 463.
  
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    AUECO 465 - International Trade Policy and Applications


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of various trade models. The application of economic tools to international trade policy; tariffs, quotas, export subsidies, and application of game theory to international trade. Prerequisite: AUECO 203. Note: AUECO 360 is highly recommended.
  
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    AUECO 480 - Ethics in Economics and Business


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Investigation of the relation between ethical reflection and the activities of businesses and economics. Attention is paid to the role of self-interest and rationality in economic and business discourse, the relation between the price system and human values, and the morality of the market as a means of social organization. Several case studies are used. Prerequisite: At least *6 at a senior-level in Economics or Management.
  
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    AUECO 490 - Senior Seminar in Economics (Capstone Course)


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) A capstone course for economics majors. Students read and discuss scholarly articles in which economics plays a role in understanding events. Students will use the economic way of thinking to prepare and present a research paper. The goal of the course is to use economic theory and data to analyze important theoretical, empirical and policy questions and also help develop analytical writing, presentation, speaking and listening skills. Prerequisites AUECO 311 and AUECO 384, or consent of the instructor. Pre/Corequisite: AUECO 385. Note: Open only to Economics majors.
  
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    AUECO 497 - Directed Reading I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of economics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in economics.
  
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    AUECO 498 - Directed Reading II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of economics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUECO 397 or 497, and consent of the instructor. Notes: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in economics.

Augustana Faculty - Education Field Experience: Undergraduate

Department of Social Sciences
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUEFX 200 - Introduction to the Profession of Teaching


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-4) Orientation to teaching. For the laboratory component of the course, a student spends half a day per week assisting in a local elementary or secondary school. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUEFX 200 and 201.
  
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    AUEFX 201 - Orientation to Teaching


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-6) Introductory education course with a field experience component for a student intending to teach at the elementary or secondary level. The field experience component consists of two three-hour or three two-hour blocks of time per week assisting in a local school classroom. Notes: The course is designed for a student intending to apply for admission to the Faculty of Education at the University of Lethbridge, which requires a field experience component of at least 60 hours. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUEFX 201 and 200.

Augustana Faculty - Educational Computing: Undergraduate

Department of Science
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUEDC 210 - Introduction to Educational Technology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5) Examination of frameworks, issues and trends regarding the role of technology in education. Students will gain hands-on experience applying learning theory and sound pedagogy to integrating technology into the school curriculum, using tools for internet use, digital media processing, multimedia/hypermedia presentations, and common software. Prerequisites: Basic computer skills, preferably with a MS Windows environment, including word processing, e-mail, and use of a web browser. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUEDC 210, EDU 210 and EDIT 202.

Augustana Faculty - Educational Psychology: Undergraduate

Department of Social Sciences
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUEPS 258 - Educational Psychology for Teaching


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1) Introduction to the fundamental concepts and issues in educational psychology. The focus is on the child from preschool to adolescence through examination of learning and instruction, individual differences, motivation, assessment, and classroom management. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102 (2016) or AUPSY 103.

Augustana Faculty - English: Undergraduate

Department of Fine Arts
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUENG 101 - Critical Reading, Critical Writing


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) English 101 is a writing-intensive course designed to facilitate the transition of L2/ESL students into the regular academic stream at Augustana. Students in this course will develop written and oral communication skills by engaging with literary texts from a variety of genres. Fundamental, universally-applicable writing skills (grammar, diction, rhetorical strategies) will be taught in collaborative workshop settings. Through a series of reflective and interpretive writing assignments, the course will also train students in the practices of analytical reading and critical thinking. The ultimate aim of this course is to provide students with the necessary building blocks for university-level writing. Prerequisite: AUEAP 145 or EAP 145 or equivalent (i.e., other L2/ESL students who were not required to take the Bridging Program).
  
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    AUENG 102 - Critical Reading, Critical Writing


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) English 102 has two objectives. The first is to train students in the practices of analytical reading and critical thinking. To that end, we will read engaging literary texts in several genres. The second objective is to help students develop effective communication skills, particularly their writing abilities. To develop writing techniques, we will workshop grammatical skills which will provide the necessary building blocks for university-level writing. Prerequisite: ELA 30-1 or AUENG 101.
  
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    AUENG 103 - English Literature from the Romantic Period to the Present


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Familiarizes students with works of literature written in English from the Romantic period (c. 1780) to the present. While this survey is chronological, equal attention will be paid to exploring the major genres in which authors wrote. Class time will be spent developing students' communication and critical thinking skills through a range of assignments and in-class workshops. Prerequisite: ELA 30-1 or AUENG 101.
  
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    AUENG 104 - English Literature from the Middle Ages to the Romantic Period


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Familiarizes students with works of literature written in English from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. While this survey is chronological, equal attention will be paid to exploring the major genres in which authors wrote. Class time will be spent developing students' communication and critical thinking skills through a range of assignments and in-class workshops. Prerequisite: AUENG 102 or 103.
  
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    AUENG 205 - Children's Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Offers a critical study of literature written for or appropriated by children. The course considers the historical development of children's literature and examines prevailing and changing attitudes toward children. It addresses major themes and issues in children's literature, and studies significant texts representative of important genres and trends in the field. Critical analysis of the literature will be stressed. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 305.
  
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    AUENG 206 - Native Children's Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Students in this course will study a diverse body of literature for children and young adults written by North American First Nations authors. The work of leading Native theorists will be included so that analysis of these picture books and novels for young people will be informed by and rooted in Indigenous ways of understanding the world. In crafting a method of reading that is grounded in the traditions and concerns of North American First Nations people, students will attend to the ways in which these texts present the oral tradition, locate themselves in specific tribal territories and cultural practices, connect their narratives to the environment, and re-present Indigenous histories. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level.
  
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    AUENG 213 - The English Language


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Introduction to the structures, varieties and uses of contemporary English, and a survey of its historical development. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 211 (2018), 212 (2018), 311 (2018), 312 (2018), or 313.
  
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    AUENG 215 - Creative Writing


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Introduction to the writing of poetry and short fiction. Literary examples are analyzed, and a student is required to write poetry and fiction with attention to specific elements of writing such as imagery, structure, dialogue, and characterization. A central element of the course is peer discussion. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level.
  
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    AUENG 220 - Classic Foundations of Western Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Offers a survey of Classical Greek and Latin literature in translation from the preHomeric period up to late antiquity. This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of major classical texts that shaped European and British literature from the Middle Ages to the present. Close attention will be paid to the evolution of genres, such as the epic, the lyric, satire, and tragedy. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 220, 320, AUCLA 220, 320.
  
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    AUENG 221 - Chaucer


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Selected works by Chaucer, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 321
  
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    AUENG 225 - Middle Ages


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Old and Middle English literature (excluding Chaucer) in its social and cultural contexts. Some works are read in translation and some in the original. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 325.
  
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    AUENG 230 - The Early English Renaissance


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Literature of sixteenth-century England, including Shakespeare, showing the influence of Renaissance ideas and literary forms. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 330.
  
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    AUENG 231 - The Later English Renaissance


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Literature of the early seventeenth century (excluding Milton) in relation to the intellectual and historical developments of the period. Representative writers include Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Marvell, Bacon, Burton, and Wroth. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 331.
  
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    AUENG 233 - Shakespeare


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-2L-0) Selected works of Shakespeare. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 233, 333, AUDRA 312 (2019).
  
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    AUENG 240 - Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature and Culture


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Literature - poetry, prose, drama and fiction - of the period between 1660 and 1800. The course is taught chronologically with a focus on the major cultural shifts of that era. Topics include satire and the public sphere, print culture, consumerism, the politics of gender and ethnicity, globalization and subjectivity. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 240, AUENG 241 (2018), AUENG 243 (2018), AUENG 341 (2018) and AUENG 343 (2018).
  
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    AUENG 268 - Women and Environmental Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of women's writing about nature and environment focusing on various themes relevant to environmental literature, primarily the various ways that the natural world is represented in literature, and the relationship between cultural constructions of nature and cultural constructions of gender, class, race, and sexuality. Works include fiction, poetry, and/or nonfiction. An introduction to several ecofeminist theorists provides a critical framework for exploring images and themes in women's environmental literature. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 268, 368, AUENV 268, 368.
  
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    AUENG 270 - United States Literature and Culture to 1865


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Representative works of American literature from discovery and the Puritan migration in the 16th and 17th centuries through the American Civil War (1861- 1865). Genres will include poetry, personal narrative, speeches and essays, short stories and novels. Authors will include lesser known writers alongside Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Stowe, Dickinson and Whitman. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 370.
  
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    AUENG 271 - United States Literature since 1865


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Representative works of American literature since the American Civil War (1861-1865). Genres will include poetry, personal narrative, speeches and essays, short stories and novels. Authors will include lesser known writers alongside Howells, Wharton, Faulkner, Plath, Pynchon, Morrison, Pinsky, Erdrich, Chabon and DeLillo. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 371.
  
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    AUENG 280 - Canadian Literature to 1950


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) As well as giving a broad sweep of the development of Canadian literature from colonial times to the middle of the twentieth century, the course focuses on three movements: the Confederation poets such as Roberts, Carman, Lampman, and D.C. Scott; the emergence of fictional realism in the works of Grove, Callaghan, MacLennan, and Wilson; and the revolt of the poets of the 1920s, F. R. Scott, Smith, Pratt, Klein, and Livesay. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 380.
  
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    AUENG 281 - Canadian Literature since 1950


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Development of literature in English in Canada from the middle of the twentieth century to the present, an age that some have termed postmodernist. The course focuses on the rise and fall of realism in fiction and also the emergence of distinctively Canadian voices among our poets. Included are works by Laurence, Atwood, Wiebe, Munro, Davies, Birney, Page, Purdy, and Layton. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 381.
  
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    AUENG 292 - Feminist Critical Theory and Women's Writing


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Several contemporary feminist critical approaches will be used to analyze writings by women from various historical periods and areas of the Englishspeaking world. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 392.
  
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    AUENG 298 - Selected Topics in English Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Studies of selected authors, works, periods, topics, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and instructor interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level.
  
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    AUENG 299 - Selected Topics in English Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Studies of selected authors, works, periods, topics, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and instructor interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: *3 in English at the 100-level. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 299 and AUENG 399.
  
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    AUENG 305 - Children's Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Offers a critical study of literature written for or appropriated by children. The course considers the historical development of children's literature and examines prevailing and changing attitudes toward children. It addresses major themes and issues in children's literature, and studies significant texts representative of important genres and trends in the field. Critical analysis of the literature will be stressed. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200-level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 205.
  
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    AUENG 306 - Native Children's Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Students in this course will study a diverse body of literature for children and young adults written by North American First Nations authors. The work of leading Native theorists will be included so that analysis of these picture books and novels for young people will be informed by and rooted in Indigenous ways of understanding the world. In crafting a method of reading that is grounded in the traditions and concerns of North American First Nations people, students will attend to the ways in which these texts present the oral tradition, locate themselves in specific tribal territories and cultural practices, connect their narratives to the environment, and re-present Indigenous histories. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215).
  
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    AUENG 313 - The English Language


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Introduction to the structures, varieties and uses of contemporary English, and a survey of its historical development. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 211 (2018), 212 (2018), 213, 311 (2018), or 312 (2018).
  
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    AUENG 314 - Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Continuation of the poetry instruction begun in AUENG 215. The completion of at least a draft of a chapbook-length collection of poems (20 to 48 pages) is required. Prerequisite: AUENG 215 or consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUENG 316 - Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Continuation of the fiction instruction begun in AUENG 215. The completion of a chapbook-length collection of fiction (20 to 48 pages) is required. Prerequisite: AUENG 215 or consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUENG 318 - Creative Writing Long Manuscript, Novel


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (variable, 1.5-0-0) Advanced study of fiction, toward a publishable end. Students will devise and complete a long manuscript project over the course of the year, and will take part in an intensive workshop process. Prerequisite: AUENG 215 and one of AUENG 314, AUENG 316 or AUENG 319.
  
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    AUENG 319 - Playwriting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-4L-0) Study of the theory of, and practice in, writing for the stage. Prerequisites: AUENG 215, or consent of the instructor. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 319 and AUDRA 384
  
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    AUENG 320 - Classical Foundations of Western Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Offers a survey of Classical Greek and Latin literature in translation from the preHomeric period up to late antiquity. This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of major classical texts that shaped European and British literature from the Middle Ages to the present. Close attention will be paid to the evolution of genres, such as the epic, the lyric, satire, and tragedy. Prerequisites: *6 of AUENG 102, 103 or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 220, 320, AUCLA 220, 320.
  
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    AUENG 321 - Chaucer


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Selected works by Chaucer, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 215]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 221.
  
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    AUENG 325 - Middle Ages


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Old and Middle English literature (excluding Chaucer) in its social and cultural contexts. Some works are read in translation and some in the original. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 215]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 225.
  
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    AUENG 330 - The Early English Renaissance


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Literature of sixteenth-century England, including Shakespeare, showing the influence of renaissance ideas and literary forms. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 230.
  
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    AUENG 331 - The Later English Renaissance


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Literature of the early seventeenth century (excluding Milton) in relation to the intellectual and historical developments of the period. Representative writers include Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Marvell, Bacon, Burton, and Wroth. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 231.
  
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    AUENG 333 - Shakespeare


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-2L-0) Selected works of Shakespeare. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 333, 233, AUDRA 312 (2019).
  
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    AUENG 368 - Women and Environmental Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of women's writing about nature and environment focusing on various themes relevant to environmental literature, primarily the various ways that the natural world is represented in literature, and the relationship between cultural constructions of nature and cultural constructions of gender, class, race, and sexuality. Works include fiction, poetry, and/or nonfiction. An introduction to several ecofeminist theorists provides a critical framework for exploring images and themes in women's environmental literature. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 268, 368, AUENV 268, 368.
  
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    AUENG 370 - United States Literature and Culture to 1865


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Representative works of American literature from discovery and the Puritan migration in the 16th and 17th centuries through the American Civil War (1861-1865). Genres will include poetry, personal narrative, speeches and essays, short stories and novels. Authors will include lesser known writers alongside Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Stowe, Dickinson and Whitman. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 270.
  
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    AUENG 371 - United States Literature since 1865


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Representative works of American literature since the American Civil War (1861-1865). Genres will include poetry, personal narrative, speeches and essays, short stories and novels. Authors will include lesser known writers alongside Howells, Wharton, Faulkner, Plath, Pynchon, Morrison, Pinsky, Erdrich, Chabon and DeLillo. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 215]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 271.
  
  •  

    AUENG 380 - Canadian Literature to 1950


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) As well as giving a broad sweep of the development of Canadian literature from colonial times to the middle of the twentieth century, the course focuses on three movements: the Confederation poets such as Roberts, Carman, Lampman, and D.C. Scott; the emergence of fictional realism in the works of Grove, Callaghan, MacLennan, and Wilson; and the revolt of the poets of the 1920s, F. R. Scott, Smith, Pratt, Klein, and Livesay. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 280.
  
  •  

    AUENG 381 - Canadian Literature since 1950


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Development of literature in English in Canada from the middle of the twentieth century to the present, an age that some have termed postmodernist. The course focuses on the rise and fall of realism in fiction and also the emergence of distinctively Canadian voices among our poets. Included are works by Laurence, Atwood, Wiebe, Munro, Davies, Birney, Page, Purdy, and Layton. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 281.
  
  •  

    AUENG 382 - Postcolonial Literature and Theory


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course explores the key themes, debates and movements in post colonial literature and theory. Attending to the depth and diversity of postcolonial literatures written in or translated into English, we will read authors from a range of regions, perspectives, cultures and traditions. Topics will include (post)colonialism, imperialism, power, knowledge, subjectivity, language, race, sexuality, gender, representation, decolonization, diaspora and indigeneity. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103 or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 215].
  
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    AUENG 392 - Feminist Critical Theory and Women's Writing


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Several contemporary feminist critical approaches will be used to analyze writings by women from various historical periods and areas of the Englishspeaking world. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200- level [excluding AUENG 215]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 292.
  
  •  

    AUENG 398 - Selected Topics in English Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Studies of selected authors, works, periods, topics, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and instructor interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215).
  
  •  

    AUENG 399 - Selected Topics in English Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Studies of selected authors, works, periods, topics, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and instructor interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103, or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 299 and AUENG 399.
  
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    AUENG 401 - Directed Reading I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of English as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: *15 at a senior level in English, including at least *3 at the 300 level, and consent of the instructor. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUENG 402 - Directed Reading II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of English as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUENG 401 and consent of the instructor. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUENG 441 - Selected Topics in English Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor.
  
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    AUENG 450 - Selected Topics in English Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor.
  
  •  

    AUENG 460 - Selected Topics in English Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor.

Augustana Faculty - English for Academic Purposes: Undergraduate

Department of Fine Arts
Augustana Faculty

  
  •  

    AUEAP 140 - English for Academic Purposes


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable) This course in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) provides advanced English language students with the opportunities to improve their academic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Upon completion of AUEAP 140, students are able to engage in short academic activities, including essay writing, reading short texts, and listening to and participating in short lectures and discussions. Delivered in Camrose, AUEAP 140 integrates this skills development focus with experiential and community-engaged learning pedagogies. Prerequisites: TOEFL: iBT: 70-85 (with a minimum score of 17 in each band), or IELTS: 5.5-6.0 (with a minimum score of 5.0 in each band), or successful completion of EAP 135 or ESL 130.
  
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    AUEAP 145 - English for Academic Purposes


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable) This course in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) builds on skills developed in AUEAP 140. Students learn to synthesize information from a variety of academic sources, think critically about materials, and present their ideas in accordance with academic standards found at the first year university-level. Delivered in Camrose, AUEAP 145 integrates this skills development focus with experiential and community-engaged learning pedagogies. Corequisite: AUEAP 140.

Augustana Faculty - Environmental Studies: Undergraduate

Department of Science
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUENV 120 - Human Activities and the Natural Environment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Introductory analysis of the interrelationships between society and the natural world, environmental consequences, and human perceptions. The characteristics and interactions of physical environmental systems and various facets of resource management (including forestry, agriculture, fisheries, protected areas, endangered species, and pollution) are described and analyzed. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 120 and AUGEO 120.
  
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    AUENV 220 - Applications in Sustainability


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) An introductory course in the theoretical and applied aspects of sustainability as it relates to key categories of energy, food, water, pollution, waste and their impacts on the environment. Current technological advances and emerging initiatives based on lowering our ecological footprint provide a basis for examining sustainability science as it relates to environmental challenges in a changing world.
  
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    AUENV 233 - Soil Science and Soil Resources


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2) Soil characteristics, formation, processes, occurrence, classification, and management in the natural and modified environment. Prerequisites: *3 course in AUBIO, AUCHE, AUENV, or AUPHY. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 233 and AUGEO 233.
  
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    AUENV 252 - Wildlife Diversity of Alberta


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Ecology, conservation, and identification of Alberta's common wildlife species, with a focus on mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, and invertebrates. A mandatory field trip will be included. Prerequisites: AUENV 120, AUGEO 120, or AUBIO 112.
  
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    AUENV 260 - Environmental Studies Practicum


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-3s-0) Practicum placement in a government, industry, or non-governmental organization to gain awareness and experience in an environmental field. Prerequisite: AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120. Notes: Open only to a student with a major in Environmental Studies/Science. AUENV 260 is classified as an arts course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 260, 261, and AUIDS 260 (2019).
  
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    AUENV 261 - Environmental Science Practicum


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-3s-0) Practicum placement in a government, industry, or non-governmental organization to gain awareness and experience in an environmental field. Prerequisites: AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120. Notes: Open only to a student with a major in Environmental Science/Studies. AUENV 261 is classified as a science course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 260, 261 and AUIDS 260 (2019).
  
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    AUENV 268 - Women and Environmental Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of women's writing about nature and environment focusing on various themes relevant to environmental literature, primarily the various ways that the natural world is represented in literature, and the relationship between cultural constructions of nature and cultural constructions of gender, class, race, and sexuality. Works include fiction, poetry, and/or nonfiction. An introduction to several ecofeminist theorists provides a critical framework for exploring images and themes in women's environmental literature. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103 or 104. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 268, 368, AUENG 268, 368.
  
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    AUENV 301 - Directed Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area in environmental science as defined by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisites: *6 in Environmental Studies. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies/Science. An application for Individual Study must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 301 is classified as a science course.
  
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    AUENV 302 - Directed Reading


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area in environmental studies as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: *6 in Environmental Studies. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 302 is classified as an arts course.
  
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    AUENV 320 - Parks and Wilderness


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of scientific principles and concepts underlying parks, wilderness and other protected area systems with emphasis on Canada. Topics include history, philosophy, conceptual frameworks, roles in sustainability, and types of biological and geographic designations. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 320, 420, AUGEO 320, 420.
  
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    AUENV 324 - Resource and Environmental Management


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Integration of both physical and human phenomena in understanding natural resources, their dimensions and boundaries. Basic concepts in resource analysis and management: the decision-making process, management frameworks and strategies, legislation and regulation, impact assessment, the role of perceptions, attitudes and behaviour, and the impact of public participation/interest groups in the development of natural resources. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120, 230, 231, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 324 and AUGEO 324. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUENV 327 - Environmental Education and Heritage Interpretation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Theory and methods of communicating environmental and heritage subject matter to a broad audience. Includes discussion of the history, theory, planning, management, implementation, and evaluation of environmental programs. The course will address a variety of personal and non-personal techniques. Prerequisites: AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120.
  
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    AUENV 328 - Environmental Politics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of contemporary debates in, and the evolution of, environmental policy and politics. This course will focus on Canadian issues in a comparative perspective, exploring topics such as environmental political theory, the policy cycle, social movements, international issues, and related case studies. Prerequisite: *3 in either Environmental Studies/Science or Political Studies. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 328 and AUPOL 328.
  
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    AUENV 334 - Field Studies in Environmental Science and Ecology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable) A 3-week field course that provides students an opportunity to develop skills in research and study design in the field of Environmental Science and Ecology. Students will live in a field camp to allow them to fully immerse themselves in their research projects, which could cover the range of ecology, botany, geography, environmental science and/or environmental studies. Course content also includes instruction in key aspects of conservation biology and resource management. Prerequisites: AUSTA 215 and AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120 and one of AUGEO 218, AUGEO 230, AUENV 252, AUBIO 253. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 334, AUENV 334 and AUGEO 334.
  
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    AUENV 335 - Wildlife Ecology and Management


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Theory and practices in the study and management of wildlife populations and communities. Population dynamics, habitat assessment and management, conservation challenges, and emerging trends. Computational models and assignments aid theoretical understanding of material. Prerequisites: AUENV 252; AUBIO 253; AUSTA 215.
  
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    AUENV 341 - Environmental Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the relationships between the economy and the environment. Emphasis is placed on the application of economic analysis to various environmental issues. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 341 and AUECO 341.
 

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