Apr 12, 2021  
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 
    
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Listings


 

Details of Courses

Courses taught at the University of Alberta are listed alphabetically. All courses, except those taught by Faculté Saint-Jean, are described in English.

Each course is designated by its computer abbreviation and a number. Students should use this abbreviation and number when completing any form requiring this information.

Courses are numbered according to the following system:

000-099 Pre-University
100-199 Basic Undergraduate. Normally requires no university-level prerequisites. Designed typically for students in the first year of a program.
200-299 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 100-level. Designed typically for students in the second year of a program.
300-399 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 200-level. Designed typically for students in the third year of a program.
400-499 Advanced Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 300-level. Designed typically for students in the fourth year of a program.
500-599 Graduate. Designated for graduate students and certain advanced or honors undergraduate students in their final year.
600-799 Graduate Courses
800-899 Special Registrations
900-999 Graduate Thesis and Project Numbers

For the purposes of program descriptions and prerequisite designation, courses numbered 100-199 are designated as Junior Courses and courses numbered 200-499 are designated as Senior Courses.

Note: Some exceptions to the course number system described above have been granted to the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.

Course Description Symbols and Figures

Several symbols and figures are used to indicate the type, duration, and weight of courses.

  1. ★—Indicates “units of course weight,” and usually follows the course title. The accompanying number indicates the weight of the course as used in computing grade point averages and for meeting degree requirements.
    A course which runs throughout the Fall/Winter (i.e., from September through April) is usually weighted ★6. A course that runs for only one term (i.e., Fall: from September to December, or Winter: from January through April) is usually weighted ★3. Certain courses are offered over Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer, or in one term, with weights of ★1, ★2, and ★4. These are considered as one-sixth, one-third, and two-thirds of a Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer course, respectively. Some honors and graduate courses involving research may vary in weight according to the length and difficulty of the project. Some clinical courses may vary in weight according to the length of clinical experience. Some courses, not included in the computation of grade point averages, are offered for credit only and either carry a weight of ★0, or are marked as “Credit.”
    Undergraduate students who take courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering but are not registered in Engineering will have a course weight assigned for these courses according to the protocol of their home Faculty.
  2. fi—Denotes: “fee index,” the value used to calculate the instructional fees for each course. The fee index is multiplied by the fee index value (given in the appropriate subsection of Fees Payment Guide ) to give the dollar value of instructional fees for the course.
    For normal courses, the fee index is twice the value of the units of course weight; for example, a course with ★3 normally has fi 6. In cases where exceptional fees considerations need to be made, the fee index is set differently by the Board of Governors.
    Note that certain programs (e.g., MD, DDS, etc.) are assessed on a program fee basis for all or certain years. In these cases, the fee index calculation does not apply.
  3. (x term, a-b-c)—These figures in parentheses give information on when the course is offered and the hours of instruction required by the course in a week, or in some cases the total time in a term.
    In the case of a single-term course, the term in which the course is given is mentioned (item x). The designation “either term” means that the course may be offered either in the first term or in the second term or in each term, at the discretion of the department concerned. The designation “variable” means that the course may be taught either as a single-term or as a full-session course.
    Item a indicates lecture hours. Item b indicates seminar hour(s), demonstration hours (d), clinic hours (c), or lecture-laboratory hours (L). Item c indicates laboratory hours. For two-term courses, the hours of instruction are the same in both terms unless otherwise indicated. The expression 3/2 means 3 hours of instruction every second week; 2s/2 means 2 seminar hours every second week.
    Examples:
    (first term, 3-0-3): a course taught in first term with 3 hours lecture, no seminar, and 3 hours lab per week.
    (second term, 0-1s-2): a course taught in second term with no lectures, 1 seminar hour, and 2 hours of lab per week.
    (either term, 3-0-0): a course taught in either first or second term, or each term, with 3 lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
    (two-term, 3-0-3): a course taught over both first and second term with three lecture hours, no seminar, and three hours lab per week.
    (variable, 3-0-0): a course which may be taught in either first or second term or over two terms with three lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
  4. Prerequisite—This provides information on courses which must be successfully completed before registering in the more advanced course.
    Corequisite—This provides information on courses which must be taken before or at the same time as the course described in the listing.
    Note: Departments are authorized to cancel the registration of those students registered in a course offered by the department if they do not meet the prerequisite and/or corequisite requirements stated in the course description in this Calendar.
  5. [Department]— This indicates the department responsible for registration for interdepartmental courses. Normally, courses will be credited to the discipline listed in the square brackets.
  6. Open Studies Courses—Courses that are available to Open Studies students are designated in Bear Tracks Course Catalog by the  symbol.  indicates that a course is available to Open Studies students on a delayed registration basis only (see Registration  for complete details).  To browse courses that have been approved for Open Studies students, see Open Studies Course Listings on the Office of the Registrar website.
Important: Registration Procedures for Two-Term Courses

Students are strongly advised to refer to the Registration and Courses menu at www.registrarsoffice.ualberta.ca for details. Two-term courses are normally offered over two terms (either Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer). In a few instances, two-term courses are offered within a single term. In all cases these are identifiable in the Class Schedule because they consist of part A and part B (e.g., English 111A and 111B).

To successfully register in a two-term course, students, must do the following:

  • Register in both the part A and part B for all types of sections offered (Lectures, Labs, Seminars, etc.);
  • Register in the same section numbers for part A and part B of a course (e.g., Lecture A1 for both part A and part B, and Lab E3 for both part A and part B);
  • Register in all the appropriate sections on the same day.

All of the above must be done or the course registration is invalid and will be deleted. Invalid registrations will be deleted nightly. It is the student’s responsibility to attempt the course registration again, subject to availability.

Example: A student wishes to register in ABCD 101, a two-term course. It has a lecture and a lab section. Based on the student’s timetable planning, decides to take Lecture C3 and Lab C8. The student must add

In Fall Term ABCD 101A Lec C3 and ABCD 101A Lab C8,
and  
In Winter Term ABCD 101B Lec C3 and ABCD 101B Lab C8.

All these sections must be added on the same day to successfully register. Otherwise the registration in ABCD 101 will be deleted overnight and the student’s place in the course will be lost.

Course Renumbering

Over the years many courses have been renumbered. Old numbers can be found within individual course listings of previous Calendar editions.

Courses on Reserve

Courses not offered in the past four years are removed from this Calendar and placed on Reserve. These courses may be taught again in the future, in which case they would be brought back into the active Course Listings and placed in the Calendar. Information about Reserve Courses is available through the Registrar’s Office, the University Secretariat, and Faculty Offices.

Faculty Specific Regulations Regarding Courses

For specific Faculty regulations relating to courses and for a complete list of subjects taught by a Faculty, please consult the Undergraduate Programs section of the Calendar at the end of each Faculty section.

Physical Requirements for University Courses

The University has a commitment to the education of all academically qualified students and special services are frequently provided on campus to assist disabled students.

Nevertheless, some courses make certain unavoidable demands on students with respect to the possession of a certain level of physical skill or ability if the academic objectives of the course are to be realized. In case of doubt, students are advised to contact the Department concerned and Student Accessibility Disability Services (SAS), Office of the Dean of Students.

Because support services cannot be guaranteed for all off-campus courses, instructors may be obliged to refuse registration in such courses.

Course Availability

The following is a comprehensive course listing of all the approved courses that the University of Alberta may offer. The appearance of a course in this list does not guarantee that the course will actually be offered. The most current information on courses is available on Bear Tracks at https://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca

Course Listings

 

Agricultural and Resource Economics: Graduate

Notes

  1. See also INT D 565  for a course offered by more than one Department or Faculty and which may be taken as an option or as a course.
  2. Undergraduate AREC courses at the 400-level may be taken for credit by graduate students in Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.

  
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    AREC 565 - Economic Valuation of Ecosystem Services


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Economic valuation of ecosystem goods and services. Topics include: Theoretical and empirical analysis of environmental valuation methods, advanced benefit cost analysis, welfare economics, valuation of ecosystem goods and services, valuation of health impacts from environmental quality change, and linkages to experimental and behavioural economics. Prerequisite: *3 Introductory Econometrics course and consent of instructor; AREC 502 recommended. [Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology]
  
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    AREC 569 - Advanced Topics in Natural Resource and Environmental Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Theoretical analysis and modeling of renewable resource and environmental issues at local and global levels. Includes analysis of international environmental issues, the effect of economic growth on the environment, sustainable development, and local and global commons management. Prerequisite: ECON 481 or consent of Department.
  
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    AREC 573 - Agricultural Economics Policy


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Goals and instruments of agricultural policy, model constructions with decision and control criteria; national, regional, and provincial agricultural application. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. AREC 313 and 502 recommended.
  
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    AREC 575 - Agriculture in Developing Countries


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Role of agriculture in the economic growth of developing countries; use of economic theory, simulations and contemporary econometric methods to understand the forces that shape the welfare of households and individuals in poor agrarian communities. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 582 - Industrial Organization in Food and Resource Industries


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Analysis of firm behavior and market structure in agri-food and resource sectors using industrial organization principles. Introduction to the internal organization of firms with applications to incentives, contracts, and corporate finance. Other topics involve ownership forms such as co-operatives; impacts of market structure on selection of firm structure; and the importance of firm objectives, performance and management incentives. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, ECON 481 recommended.
  
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    AREC 584 - Marketing Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Microeconomic theory and analysis of markets for agricultural and food products. Topics will vary with the evolution of the literature but may include alternative market structures, market regulation, empirical price analysis, advertising, location theories, the role of information in markets, the role of uncertainty in markets, and organization structures. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. AREC 313 and 502 recommended.
  
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    AREC 585 - Agricultural Trade


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Concepts and principles underlying international trade and specialization applied to agricultural and food products. Protection and its economic impacts. Agricultural trade policy, institutions and agreements. The role of agricultural trade in developed and less developed countries. Analysis of imperfect markets and alternative approaches to trade liberalization. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.
  
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    AREC 600 - Directed Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Analysis of selected research problems and design of research projects in production economics, natural resource economics, or marketing economics. Prerequisite: consent of Department Chair.
  
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    AREC 630 - Economic Impact Assessment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Examination of the theory and application of economic assessment methods with a focus on the evaluation of environmental, agricultural and natural resource projects, regulatory policy, and planning. Includes case studies of recent project and policy proposals to illustrate the methods used to evaluate economic benefits and costs of such proposals. Applications to estimating private economic benefits. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 430. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 633 - Financial Management in Resource Industries


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) Recent theoretical and empirical developments in finance are applied to natural resource industries including agribusiness, farming, forestry and food. Emphasis on capital budgeting, financial risk, and associated topics for long run investment planning in smaller business enterprises. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 433. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 660 - Land Use Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) This course introduces concepts and methods employed in the economics of land use and land use change. Topics include: theoretical and empirical analysis of determinants and drivers of land use and land use change; environmental and socioeconomic consequences of land use change; the role of governments in managing land-use decisions; and spatial analysis in land-use research. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 460. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 665 - Advanced Natural Resource Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Applied economic modeling of resource utilization and environmental issues with a focus in forestry and agriculture. Topics may include current Canadian and international issues in the area of environmental valuation, energy, climate change, biodiversity and conservation as related to Forestry and Agriculture. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 465. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 671 - Society and Well-Being


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Economic, political, historical, and legal perspectives on how and why governments promote well-being in areas such as food safety, nutritional policy, consumer protection, recreation, and the workplace. Topics include the historical development of wellness-related policies, how these decisions are made in society, and economic and moral justifications for such interventions. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 471. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 673 - Food and Agricultural Policies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Economics of public policy for agriculture and food industries. Public choice principles and institutions. Farm and food policy in Canada and selected countries. Case studies on price and output policy; agricultural trade; food safety and quality; resource use and environmental sustainability; and/or rural change/restructuring. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 473. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 682 - Cooperatives and Alternative Business Models


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) The impact of agri-food and resource market structures on market conduct and performance; the impact of market structure on selection of cooperative versus investor owned firms including differences in firm objectives, performance and management incentives; topics may also include effects of firm type on community development and policy formation. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 482. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 684 - Strategic Management in Food and Resource Businesses


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Analysis of strategic management concepts and applications to agri-food and resource industries. The development of business and corporate strategies including competitive positioning; sustaining competitive advantage; vertical coordination and strategic alliances in value chains; corporate diversification and global business strategy. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 484. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 685 - Trade and Globalization in Food and Resources


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) Principles and policies affecting international trade in food, forestry and natural resources. Current issues in trade, including fair trade concerns, trade in capital and services, effects of food safety and quality standards, and environmental issues surrounding trade agreements and institutions. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 485. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 687 - Managing Market Risk in Resource Industries


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of the mechanics and economic functions of commodity futures and options derivative markets. Topics include the theory and practice of hedging, price formation and issues unique to commodities. Emphasis on concepts and analysis to evaluate derivative markets; use of derivatives to manage market risk in agribusiness, forestry and other resource businesses. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 487. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 688 - Introduction to Agricultural and Resource Game Theory


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Game theory analyzes situations in which payoffs to agents depend on the behavior of other agents. Basics of game theoretic analysis are introduced. Applications to the agri-food and resource industries are discussed. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 488. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AREC 900 - Directed Research Project


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (variable, unassigned)

Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science: Undergraduate

Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science
Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

Note: See also Animal Science (AN SC), Environmental and Conservation Sciences (ENCS), Interdisciplinary (INT D), Nutrition (NUTR), Nutrition and Food Science (NU FS), Plant Science (PL SC), Renewable Resources (REN R) and Soil Science (SOILS) for related courses.

  
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    AFNS 401 - Honors Seminar


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0) Covers specialized topics of current interest to BSc Honors in Food Science students. Presentations by students, faculty and invited speakers. Pre- or corequisite: NU FS 407.
  
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    AFNS 414 - Lipid Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Fundamentals in lipid biochemistry featuring learning modules of relevance to students of plant, food and animal science, and human nutrition, and other life science. Topics include characteristics of lipids, environmental effects on lipid metabolism, oilseed biotechnology and biomass solutions for petrochemical alternatives. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: BIOCH 200 or PL SC 345.
  
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    AFNS 416 - One Health


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) 'One Health' is an emerging paradigm in public and veterinary health which recognizes that human, animal and environmental health are interlinked. The course will address food and water safety, the increase in prevalence of antibiotic resistant organisms, emerging infectious zoonotic diseases, environmental protection and environmental sustainability, emphasizing the interaction of these diverse yet interconnected disciplines in protecting the health of populations. Prerequisites: *3 MICRB and *3 PHYSL.

Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science: Graduate

Note: Prerequisites are shown to provide an indication of the background that is expected for these courses. Students not having the prerequisites for a course are encouraged to discuss their case with the course Instructor.

  
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    AFNS 500 - Individual Study


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable) Project or reading course under the supervision of a Faculty member requiring preparation of a comprehensive report. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: May be taken more than once provided the topic is different.
  
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    AFNS 502 - Advanced Study of Food Fermentations


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-0) Readings and class presentations on current developments in bacterial or fungal fermentation of foods. Development in Probiotics. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 402. Prerequisite: MICRB 265, NU FS 361, or NU FS 363.
  
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    AFNS 503 - Processing of Milk and Dairy Products


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-0) Technological principles of milk treatment and processes for fluid milk products; concentrated, dried, sterilized and fermented dairy products; cheese, butter and ice cream. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 403. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 504 - Muscle Food Science and Technology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2) Biological, biochemical, chemical, and technological aspects of the processing of animal muscle food including seafood product technology. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 404. Prerequisite: *3 BIOCH.
  
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    AFNS 506 - Rangeland Plant Communities of Western Canada


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Examines major rangeland plant communities and their physical environments in western Canada, including individual plant identification and ecology. Includes a review of various land uses such as livestock and wildlife grazing within these communities, their response to disturbances such as herbivory and fire, and other management considerations. Not to be taken if credit received for ENCS 406. Prerequisite: ENCS 356 or consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 507 - Science and Technology of Cereal and Oilseed Processing


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3/2) Biological, biochemical, chemical, and technological aspects of the processing of cereals and oilseeds. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 406. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 508 - Applied Bioinformatics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Introduction to databases, software tools, and analysis methods used to characterize DNA and protein sequences. Topics include information retrieval from sequence databases, protein function prediction, assessing sequence similarity, measuring gene expression, and the analysis of highthroughput sequencing data. Normally offered in alternate years. Not to be taken if credit received for AFNS 460. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 510 - Renewable Biomaterials


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Fundamentals in bio-based materials development, characterization, and applications. Sources and classification of biomaterials, synthesis of renewable polymeric biomaterials, their characterization using different techniques, and industrial applications will be discussed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 511 - Veterinary Immunology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Application of immunological principles to the understanding of animal health and disease with a focus on livestock and companion animals. Students will apply a broad understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the basic mechanisms of disease progression to assess the short and long-term impact of pathogenesis to the health of animals, their caretakers, and consumers. Lectures will be followed by active discussion of selected readings. Not to be taken if credit received for AN SC 411. Prerequisites: IMIN 200 and consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 514 - Lipid Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Fundamentals in lipid biochemistry featuring learning modules of relevance to students of plant, food and animal science, and human nutrition, and other life science. Topics include characteristics of lipids, environmental effects on lipid metabolism, oilseed biotechnology and biomass solutions for petrochemical alternatives. Normally offered in alternate years. Not to be taken if credit received for AFNS 414. Prerequisite: BIOCH 200, PL SC 345, or consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 516 - One Health


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) 'One Health' is an emerging paradigm in public and veterinary health which recognizes that human, animal and environmental health are interlinked. The course will address food and water safety, the increase in prevalence of antibiotic resistant organisms, emerging infectious zoonotic diseases, environmental protection and environmental sustainability, emphasizing the interaction of these diverse yet interconnected disciplines in protecting the health of populations. Not to be taken if credit received for AFNS 416, SPH 416, or SPH 516. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 520 - Ruminant Physiology and Metabolic Diseases


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) A discussion-based course on current literature in digestive physiology, endocrinology, and metabolic diseases of ruminant animals. Offered only in odd numbered years. Prerequisite: *3 in each of Nutrition and Physiology.
  
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    AFNS 521 - Meat Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2) The conversion of muscle to meat in livestock and poultry: definitions and measurement of carcass and meat quality; influences of pre- and post-slaughter factors on carcass and meat quality. The lab will consist of a two-day field trip during Reading Week. Not to be taken if credit received for AN SC 420. Prerequisites: *3 BIOCH or AN SC 320, and consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 522 - Advanced Biocatalysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) Will focus on taking a practical approach to whole cell fermentation systems and enzyme-based approaches as well as synthetic biology. The students will learn the theories behind, and applications of, the most commonly used approaches in the bio-industrial and food industries. The course will deploy a mixture of lectures, peer discussion and debate, guest speakers, and group activities. Prerequisite: *3 Microbiology or Food Microbiology, or consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 524 - Nutrition and Metabolism Related to Cancer


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) A lecture and reading course to address nutritional issues specifically related to cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 424, ONCOL 424, or ONCOL 524. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Offered jointly by the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry).
  
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    AFNS 527 - Food Safety


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) Providing students with an understanding of the principles of risk: benefit evaluations related to safety concerns about foods. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 427. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 528 - Advances in Human Nutrition and the Intestinal Microbiome


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0) Overview of the role of microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract and the impact on human health, interaction with dietary components and potential dietary modulation of the microbiome in the prevention of chronic disease. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 428. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. *3 MICRB and *6 PHYSL recommended.
  
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    AFNS 530 - Principles of Sensory Evaluation of Foods


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Principles and methods of analysis of the sensory properties of foods; appearance, texture, aroma, and taste. Physiology of sensory receptors. Applications, advantages, and limitations of sensory methods. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 430. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 532 - Advanced Food Protein Chemistry and Technology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) Chemistry and technology of food protein purification, modification, structure and functional properties. Food related proteins from animal and plant sources will be discussed. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 542 - Sustainability of Food and Bio-based Products


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-2s-0) This course provides a comprehensive review on sustainability in the food and "green" products industries, and provides a hands-on introduction to methods such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) which is used to evaluate the environmental impact of products and processes. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 442. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 543 - Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease and Lifestyle


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) This is an advanced course examining the relationship between the role of lifestyle factors in the etiology and pathophysiology, as well as the treatment of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Application of recent findings to our understanding of these chronic metabolic diseases will be addressed. Not to be taken if credit received for NUTR 443. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 552 - Nutrition in the Prevention of Chronic Human Diseases


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) A lecture and reading course for graduate students to review current research and the scientific basis of nutrition intervention in the prevention and treatment of chronic human disease. Translation of research findings to nutrition recommendations in topical areas including global health and food supply, obesity, cardiovascular disease, polycystic ovary syndrome and behavior-cognitive disorders. Not to be taken if credit received for NUTR 452. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. *6 PHYSL recommended.
  
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    AFNS 554 - Unit Operations in Food Preservation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Processes used in food preservation. Dehydration, freezing, sterilization and canning, irradiation and high pressure processing. Effect of processing on food properties. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 454. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 561 - Ruminant Digestion, Metabolism, and Nutrition


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Integration of theory and practical concepts in ruminant nutrition, digestion and metabolism through topics such as energy flow in ruminants, protein systems and net feed efficiency. Laboratories will involve formulation of rations for various physiological states of beef and dairy cattle, economical rations, feed mixes, protein systems (degradable and undegradable protein systems) and net feed efficiency formulations. Not to be taken if credit received for AN SC 461. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 562 - Swine Nutrition


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Nutrient utilization and requirements, feed ingredients, and applied feeding program. Feed formulation strategies and current topics in swine nutrition will be discussed in detail. Not to be taken if credit received for AN SC 462. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 563 - Poultry Nutrition


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Nutritional requirements, feeding programs, and feed ingredients used for poultry. Feed formulation strategies and current topics in poultry nutrition will be discussed extensively. Not to be taken if credit received for AN SC 462, AN SC 463, or AFNS 515. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.
  
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    AFNS 565 - Plant Breeding


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) This course will focus on different plant breeding methods and their relationship to the major crop species, as well as use of different molecular and biotechnology techniques in plant breeding. Not to be taken if credit received for PL SC 465. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 566 - Advanced Food Microbiology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-0) A lecture/discussion course on selected topics in food microbiology. Prerequisite: One of: (MICRB 265, NU FS 361, or 363) and consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 568 - Clinical Nutrition


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Basic principles of nutrition in clinical situations. The role of diet in the management of various diseases. The laboratory sessions include practical experience in providing individualized nutritional care for clients from various cultural backgrounds. Not to be taken if credit received for NUTR 468. Pre- or corequisite: NUTR 301.
  
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    AFNS 569 - Advanced Animal Metabolism


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) A discussion-based course on selected topics in energy and nitrogen digestion and metabolism in domestic animals. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: 400 level animal nutrition course and consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 570 - Experimental Procedures in Nutrition and Metabolism


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6) Current methodologies in nutrition and metabolism. Prerequisites: NUTR 301 and NUTR 302, or consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 571 - Applied Poultry Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Study of avian anatomy, physiology, behavior, and health as it relates to modern poultry production. Current management practices to optimize production efficiency and animal well-being are examined. Not to be taken if credit received for AN SC 471. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 572 - Practical Case Studies in Rangeland Management and Conservation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Cumulative effects of fire, grazing, browsing, and improvement practices on the productivity and species composition of range and pasture ecosystems, including management implications. Extended field trip prior to the start of classes. Normally offered in alternate years. Not to be taken if credit received for ENCS 471. Prerequisite: ENCS 356. ENCS 406 recommended.
  
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    AFNS 574 - Applied Beef Cattle Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Examination of current and potential future production and management practices to optimize production efficiency and animal well-being in the Canadian and international beef industry. Laboratories emphasize practical applications, field trips, and discussion. Not to be taken if credit received for AN SC 474. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 575 - Advanced Functional Genomics Technologies in Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6) Modular course offering training in a variety of research technologies. Modules offered will vary from term to term. Modules may include HPLC, gel electrophoresis, real-time PCR, gene isolation and cloning, gene amplification, cDNA library screening and microarray. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
  
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    AFNS 576 - Applied Swine Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Evaluation of swine breeding, feeding, housing management, and disease prevention practices that optimize production efficiency and animal well-being. Laboratories involve analysis of production practices with a view to optimizing efficiency. Not to be taken if credit received for AN SC 476. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 577 - Advanced Community Nutrition


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Examination of nutrition problems in contemporary communities that relate to health promotion, food security, policy, program planning and community nutrition throughout the life cycle. Discussion of nutrition programs and resources. Students will develop the skills to write a community grant application. Not to be taken if credit received for NUTR 477. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 578 - Advanced Clinical Nutrition


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) The principles of diet therapy in selected areas of current interest. Emphasis on case studies, research and practical problems in clinical dietetics. Not to be taken if credit received for NUTR 476. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 580 - Advanced Study of Microbial Food Safety


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-0) Emerging issues in microbiological safety of foods. Reading and class presentations on current developments in the microbiological safety of foods. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 480. Prerequisite: MICRB 265 or consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 581 - Advanced Foods


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Critical evaluation of current literature on the effects of ingredients and processing on quality characteristics of foods. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 481. Prerequisites: NU FS 374 and *3 BIOCH or consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 582 - Diseases of Field and Horticultural Crops


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0) Diseases of cereal, oilseed, pulse, forage, vegetable, fruit, and ornamental crops. Normally offered in alternate years. Not to be taken if credit received for PL SC 481. Prerequisite: PL SC 380 or consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 585 - Advanced Quantitative Genomics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Genetics and analysis of quantitative traits in farm animals and plants. Detecting, locating and measuring effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL). Recent developments in QTL mapping and discovery. The laboratory sessions include commonly used software for analyzing data from breeding and genomics experiments. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 595 - Integrated Crop Protection


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0) Integrated agronomic, mechanical, biological, and chemical control of insects, disease organisms, and weeds that interfere with field crop and horticultural crop production. Not to be taken if credit received for PL SC 495. Prerequisites: ENT 222, PL SC 352, and PL SC 380; one course may be taken as a corequisite, or consent of the instructor.
  
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    AFNS 599 - Advanced Agri-Chemical Analysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Advanced analysis of food and agri-industrial materials with a focus on good laboratory practices (GLP), chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC), mass spectrometry, and other modern techniques from sample preparation to analysis of data. Not to be taken if credit received for NU FS 499. Prerequisite: NU FS 372 or consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 601 - Seminar


    ★ 1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-2s-0) Covers specialized topics of current interest to graduate students in AFNS. Presentations by students, faculty and invited speakers. Students register in one of four sections - Animal Science, Plant Science, Food Science or Human Nutrition. Attendance is required of all graduate students throughout their program. MSc students normally register for one term in year 2, and are required to present one seminar; PhD students normally register for one term in each of year 1 and 3, and are required to present one seminar per term.
  
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    AFNS 602 - Graduate Reading Project


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable) Individual study. Critical reviews of selected literature under the direction of a Faculty member. Note: May be taken more than once if the topic is different. Prerequisite: consent of Department.
  
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    AFNS 603 - Graduate Research Project


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable) Directed laboratory study under supervision of a Faculty member. Note: May be taken more than once if the topic is different. Prerequisite: consent of Department.
  
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    AFNS 660 - Communication in Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0) Course designed for graduate students in the early stages of their graduate program. Students will learn effective communication skills for life as a graduate student and a future scientist. Topics will include the scientific method; paper, thesis and grant writing; poster and lecture development and delivery; ethics in science; graduate student supervisor relationships. Preference given to those in the first year of their program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    AFNS 675 - Introduction to Research Methods in Nutritional Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-3s-0) To develop skills in critical review of the literature, formulation of research questions and hypotheses, and the execution and presentation of research in the nutrition and metabolism fields. Lectures include concepts in experimental design, logistics of data collection and basic statistical analysis. The seminar includes practical application of these tools and completion of a critical review to compliment student's research program. Normally taken by students in the MSc and PhD in Nutrition and Metabolism during the first year of their graduate studies program.
  
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    AFNS 900 - Directed Research Project (Course-based Masters)


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned) Individual study supervised by the student's supervisor, requiring the preparation of a comprehensive report, presentation of a seminar and oral examination by the student's supervisor and one additional faculty member.

Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences: Undergraduate

Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

  
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    ALES 204 - Communication Fundamentals for Professionals


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Successful professionals require strong communication skills. This course focuses on interpersonal communication in professional settings, examining factors that enhance or impede communication and exploring strategies for communicating more effectively with different audiences. Students develop written, visual, and oral communication skills that help them connect with others both in and outside the organization, and convey information in positive and persuasive ways. [Human Ecology]
  
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    ALES 291 - Topics in Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences


    ★ 3-6 (variable) (variable, variable) Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. Sections may require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    ALES 391 - Topics in Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences


    ★ 3-6 (variable) (variable, variable) Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. Sections may require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    ALES 491 - Topics in Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences


    ★ 3-6 (variable) (variable, variable) Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. Sections may require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

American Sign Language: Undergraduate

Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies
Faculty of Arts

Notes

  1. The Department reserves the right to place students in the language course appropriate to their level of language skill.
  2. Placement tests may be administered in order to assess prior background. Students with an American Sign Language background should consult a Department advisor. Such students may be granted advanced placement and directed to register in an advanced course more suitable to their level of ability. Students seeking to fulfill their Language Other than English requirement may begin at any one appropriate level, but must take the full ★6 in one language.
  3. The Department will withhold credit from students completing courses for which prior background is deemed to make them ineligible. For example, 100-level courses are normally restricted to students with little or no prior knowledge in that language. Should a student with matriculation standing, or those possessing prior background (such as native speakers or those for whom it is their first language) register in the 100-level course, credit may be withheld.

  
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    ASL 111 - Beginners' American Sign Language I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0) Designed to provide basic practical communication and conversational skill in American Sign Language for students with little or no previous background. Covers material in matriculation-level ASL. Note: Not to be taken by students with native or near native proficiency, or students with credit in ASL 35 or its equivalents in Canada or other countries. Not to be taken by students with credit in EDPY 474 or 565.
  
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    ASL 112 - Beginners' American Sign Language II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0) Prerequisite: ASL 111 or consent of Department. Note: Not to be taken by students with native or near native proficiency, or students with credit in ASL 35 or its equivalents in Canada or other countries.
  
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    ASL 211 - Intermediate American Sign Language I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0) Intensive instruction in ASL Topics covered on deaf community and culture. Prerequisite: ASL 35 or ASL 112 or consent of Department.
  
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    ASL 212 - Intermediate American Sign Language II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0) Prerequisite: ASL 211 or consent of Department.

Anatomie: Cours de 1er cycle

Faculté Saint-Jean

  
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    ANATE 140 - Anatomie


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-0-0) Introduction aux structures du corps humain. Doit être complété avant l'année 2 du BScInf (bilingue). Note(s): (1) La priorité sera accordée aux étudiants du BScInf (bilingue). (2) Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour NURS 140. (3) Les étudiants du BScInf (bilingue) et ceux qui envisagent de transférer au programme doivent obtenir une note de passage d'au moins C+ afin de pouvoir continuer dans le programme.
  
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    ANATE 200 - Morphologie Humaine


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-0-0) Introduction à l'anatomie du corps humain. Le cours traite de l'anatomie macroscopique et microscopique des tissus, organes et des systèmes du corps humain, en mettant l'accent sur les relations, les interactions et les fonctions des structures majeures. Note : Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ANATE 140, ANAT 200, ou NURS 140.
  
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    ANATE 409 - Histologie Humaine


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 2-0-1) Ce cours d'introduction à l'histologie mettra l'accent sur la reconnaissance et l'identification de la structure et de l'organisation cellulaire associée à la physiologie normale des divers tissus et organes du corps humain. Ce cours comportera une part égale de cours théoriques et de laboratoires étant donné qu'il est essentiel d'acquérir et développer le sens de l'observation nécessaire à l'étude de l'histologie. Ce cours devrait permettre une compréhension de la relation étroite entre l'histologie, la physiologie et la pratique médicale. Préalables: BIOLE 201, PHYSE 210, ou PHYSL 210, ou PHYSL 212 et 214, ou ZOOL 241 et 242.

Anatomy: Undergraduate

Division of Anatomy
Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

  
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    ANAT 200 - Human Morphology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) An introductory survey course in general human anatomy. The course covers the gross and microscopic anatomy of the tissues, organs and organ systems of the body, with emphasis on the relationships, interactions and functions of major structures.
  
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    ANAT 305 - Cross-Sectional Anatomy


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-2) A study of human gross anatomy from a regional perspective, with a particular emphasis on cross-sectional structure and three-dimensional relationships. Students will apply their knowledge to correlate prosected human cadaveric specimens with radiological images derived from a variety of techniques. This course is intended to prepare students who are considering a career in applied radiological imaging and radiotherapy. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or permission of the Department.
  
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    ANAT 400 - Human Embryonic Development


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) A study of the development of the human embryo from conception to birth. The development of cells, tissues and organs of specific major structures will be covered including their relative development to other systems and structures. An understanding of anomalous development and the ability to survive will be included based on a thorough understanding of normal development. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or consent of Division. Note: Credit will be granted for only one of ANAT 300 or 400.
  
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    ANAT 401 - Human Neuroanatomy


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) A study of the human nervous system including its development and function from an anatomical viewpoint. Both the central and peripheral nervous systems will be presented with some emphasis on abnormal development and its consequences. There will be an emphasis on clinical application where appropriate. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or consent of Division. Note: Credit will be granted for only one of ANAT 301 or 401.
  
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    ANAT 403 - The Human Body


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (first term, 3-0-5) A detailed, regional study of the gross anatomy of the human body using functional, clinical, and evolutionary perspectives. Will include lectures and laboratory sessions involving dissection of human cadavers. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or equivalent and consent of Division.
  
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    ANAT 490 - Individual Study


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6) Registration is contingent upon a student having made prior arrangements with a Faculty member in the Division. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. This is primarily a supervised self-study in any of the anatomical disciplines. Prerequisite: consent of Division.
  
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    ANAT 491 - Current Topics in Anatomy


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1s-0) Discussion of topics relevant to the anatomical disciplines. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. Prerequisite: consent of Division.
  
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    ANAT 497 - Research Project


    ★ 4-8 (variable) (variable, variable) Directed research carried out in the laboratory of an assigned member of the Division. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. Successful completion requires a written report and oral presentation on the research project. Registration is contingent upon a student having made prior arrangements with a Faculty member in the Division. Prerequisite: consent of Division.

Anatomy: Graduate

  
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    ANAT 500 - Human Development


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) A study of human development from conception to birth. The formation of tissues and organ systems will be covered, including their relations to other developing systems and structures. An understanding of anomalous development and the ability to survive will be included based on thorough understanding of normal developmental processes. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or consent of Division. Restricted to students registered in the Pathologist's Assistant program.
  
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    ANAT 503 - Human Anatomy


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (first term, 3-0-5) A detailed, regional examination of human structure incorporating functional, developmental, clinical and evolutionary perspectives. This course will used both didactic and practical instruction, including the dissection of human cadaveric tissue. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 with a minimum grade of B+ or consent of Division. Restricted to students registered in the Pathologist's Assistant program.
  
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    ANAT 600 - Medical Gross Anatomy


    ★ 8 (fi 16) (two term, 0-0-12) Advanced study of human gross anatomy. Will entail supervised, self-directed, hands-on dissection by the student for the examination of human structure and function. Particular emphasis will be placed on the clinical relevance of Human Anatomy and its importance to clinical medicine. Prerequisite: consent of Division.
  
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    ANAT 603 - Medical Histology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-1) Advanced study of human histology with an emphasis on the relevance of histological examination to clinical medicine. Students will participate in discussions and complete a web-based interactive program. Prerequisite: consent of Division.
  
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    ANAT 606 - Selected Topics in Advanced Human Anatomy


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3) An in-depth, supervised, self-directed study focussing on topics relevant to the anatomical disciplines. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. Registration is contingent upon a student having made prior arrangements with a Faculty member in the Division. Prerequisite: consent of Division.
  
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    ANAT 607 - Current Topics in Human Anatomy


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1s-0) Discussion of topics relevant to the anatomical disciplines. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. Prerequisite: consent of Division.

Anglais: Undergraduate

Faculté Saint-Jean

Notes

  1. Only one ★6 or two ★3 courses at the 100 level can be credited to the BA program.
  2. Prerequisite for 200, 300, and 400 level courses is ★6 of junior level English/Anglais.
  3. ★6 of junior level English/Anglais can include ANGL 111 or ANGL 113 , or ANGL 122  and ANGL 126 .
  4. ANGL 102 was previously the final course in the series of Anglais langue seconde courses (ALS). It does not qualify for credit toward the required ★6 of junior level English/Anglais. (see Compulsory Test for Students Admitted Without English 30 or Equivalent  and notes Course Listings ).
  5. ANGL 102 is now called ALS 125 . The course remains the same.

  
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    ANGL 122 - Texts and Contexts


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course explores a specific issue using a variety of genres and media. Not to be taken by students with *6 in approved junior English/Anglais including ANGL 101, 111, 113. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 30-1 or ANGL 102 or ALS 125 or equivalent.
  
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    ANGL 123 - Language, Literature and Culture


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Studies in the literary and cultural uses of language. Not to be taken by students with *6 in approved junior English/Anglais including ANGL 101, 111 or 113. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 30-1 or ANGL 102 or ALS 125 or equivalent.
 

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