May 15, 2021  
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 
    
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Listings


 

Details of Courses

Courses taught at the University of Alberta are listed alphabetically. All courses, except those taught by Faculté Saint-Jean, are described in English.

Each course is designated by its computer abbreviation and a number. Students should use this abbreviation and number when completing any form requiring this information.

Courses are numbered according to the following system:

000-099 Pre-University
100-199 Basic Undergraduate. Normally requires no university-level prerequisites. Designed typically for students in the first year of a program.
200-299 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 100-level. Designed typically for students in the second year of a program.
300-399 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 200-level. Designed typically for students in the third year of a program.
400-499 Advanced Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 300-level. Designed typically for students in the fourth year of a program.
500-599 Graduate. Designated for graduate students and certain advanced or honors undergraduate students in their final year.
600-799 Graduate Courses
800-899 Special Registrations
900-999 Graduate Thesis and Project Numbers

For the purposes of program descriptions and prerequisite designation, courses numbered 100-199 are designated as Junior Courses and courses numbered 200-499 are designated as Senior Courses.

Note: Some exceptions to the course number system described above have been granted to the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.

Course Description Symbols and Figures

Several symbols and figures are used to indicate the type, duration, and weight of courses.

  1. ★—Indicates “units of course weight,” and usually follows the course title. The accompanying number indicates the weight of the course as used in computing grade point averages and for meeting degree requirements.
    A course which runs throughout the Fall/Winter (i.e., from September through April) is usually weighted ★6. A course that runs for only one term (i.e., Fall: from September to December, or Winter: from January through April) is usually weighted ★3. Certain courses are offered over Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer, or in one term, with weights of ★1, ★2, and ★4. These are considered as one-sixth, one-third, and two-thirds of a Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer course, respectively. Some honors and graduate courses involving research may vary in weight according to the length and difficulty of the project. Some clinical courses may vary in weight according to the length of clinical experience. Some courses, not included in the computation of grade point averages, are offered for credit only and either carry a weight of ★0, or are marked as “Credit.”
    Undergraduate students who take courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering but are not registered in Engineering will have a course weight assigned for these courses according to the protocol of their home Faculty.
  2. fi—Denotes: “fee index,” the value used to calculate the instructional fees for each course. The fee index is multiplied by the fee index value (given in the appropriate subsection of Fees Payment Guide ) to give the dollar value of instructional fees for the course.
    For normal courses, the fee index is twice the value of the units of course weight; for example, a course with ★3 normally has fi 6. In cases where exceptional fees considerations need to be made, the fee index is set differently by the Board of Governors.
    Note that certain programs (e.g., MD, DDS, etc.) are assessed on a program fee basis for all or certain years. In these cases, the fee index calculation does not apply.
  3. (x term, a-b-c)—These figures in parentheses give information on when the course is offered and the hours of instruction required by the course in a week, or in some cases the total time in a term.
    In the case of a single-term course, the term in which the course is given is mentioned (item x). The designation “either term” means that the course may be offered either in the first term or in the second term or in each term, at the discretion of the department concerned. The designation “variable” means that the course may be taught either as a single-term or as a full-session course.
    Item a indicates lecture hours. Item b indicates seminar hour(s), demonstration hours (d), clinic hours (c), or lecture-laboratory hours (L). Item c indicates laboratory hours. For two-term courses, the hours of instruction are the same in both terms unless otherwise indicated. The expression 3/2 means 3 hours of instruction every second week; 2s/2 means 2 seminar hours every second week.
    Examples:
    (first term, 3-0-3): a course taught in first term with 3 hours lecture, no seminar, and 3 hours lab per week.
    (second term, 0-1s-2): a course taught in second term with no lectures, 1 seminar hour, and 2 hours of lab per week.
    (either term, 3-0-0): a course taught in either first or second term, or each term, with 3 lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
    (two-term, 3-0-3): a course taught over both first and second term with three lecture hours, no seminar, and three hours lab per week.
    (variable, 3-0-0): a course which may be taught in either first or second term or over two terms with three lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
  4. Prerequisite—This provides information on courses which must be successfully completed before registering in the more advanced course.
    Corequisite—This provides information on courses which must be taken before or at the same time as the course described in the listing.
    Note: Departments are authorized to cancel the registration of those students registered in a course offered by the department if they do not meet the prerequisite and/or corequisite requirements stated in the course description in this Calendar.
  5. [Department]— This indicates the department responsible for registration for interdepartmental courses. Normally, courses will be credited to the discipline listed in the square brackets.
  6. Open Studies Courses—Courses that are available to Open Studies students are designated in Bear Tracks Course Catalog by the  symbol.  indicates that a course is available to Open Studies students on a delayed registration basis only (see Registration  for complete details).  To browse courses that have been approved for Open Studies students, see Open Studies Course Listings on the Office of the Registrar website.
Important: Registration Procedures for Two-Term Courses

Students are strongly advised to refer to the Registration and Courses menu at www.registrarsoffice.ualberta.ca for details. Two-term courses are normally offered over two terms (either Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer). In a few instances, two-term courses are offered within a single term. In all cases these are identifiable in the Class Schedule because they consist of part A and part B (e.g., English 111A and 111B).

To successfully register in a two-term course, students, must do the following:

  • Register in both the part A and part B for all types of sections offered (Lectures, Labs, Seminars, etc.);
  • Register in the same section numbers for part A and part B of a course (e.g., Lecture A1 for both part A and part B, and Lab E3 for both part A and part B);
  • Register in all the appropriate sections on the same day.

All of the above must be done or the course registration is invalid and will be deleted. Invalid registrations will be deleted nightly. It is the student’s responsibility to attempt the course registration again, subject to availability.

Example: A student wishes to register in ABCD 101, a two-term course. It has a lecture and a lab section. Based on the student’s timetable planning, decides to take Lecture C3 and Lab C8. The student must add

In Fall Term ABCD 101A Lec C3 and ABCD 101A Lab C8,
and  
In Winter Term ABCD 101B Lec C3 and ABCD 101B Lab C8.

All these sections must be added on the same day to successfully register. Otherwise the registration in ABCD 101 will be deleted overnight and the student’s place in the course will be lost.

Course Renumbering

Over the years many courses have been renumbered. Old numbers can be found within individual course listings of previous Calendar editions.

Courses on Reserve

Courses not offered in the past four years are removed from this Calendar and placed on Reserve. These courses may be taught again in the future, in which case they would be brought back into the active Course Listings and placed in the Calendar. Information about Reserve Courses is available through the Registrar’s Office, the University Secretariat, and Faculty Offices.

Faculty Specific Regulations Regarding Courses

For specific Faculty regulations relating to courses and for a complete list of subjects taught by a Faculty, please consult the Undergraduate Programs section of the Calendar at the end of each Faculty section.

Physical Requirements for University Courses

The University has a commitment to the education of all academically qualified students and special services are frequently provided on campus to assist disabled students.

Nevertheless, some courses make certain unavoidable demands on students with respect to the possession of a certain level of physical skill or ability if the academic objectives of the course are to be realized. In case of doubt, students are advised to contact the Department concerned and Student Accessibility Disability Services (SAS), Office of the Dean of Students.

Because support services cannot be guaranteed for all off-campus courses, instructors may be obliged to refuse registration in such courses.

Course Availability

The following is a comprehensive course listing of all the approved courses that the University of Alberta may offer. The appearance of a course in this list does not guarantee that the course will actually be offered. The most current information on courses is available on Bear Tracks at https://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca

Course Listings

 

Abroad, Study Term: Graduate

Education Abroad Program

  
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    ABROD 900 - Study Term Abroad


    ★ 0 (fi 0) (either term, unassigned) This course is reserved for students who wish to maintain registration while participating in programs or courses at other accredited post-secondary institutions, where they pay tuition fees directly to the host institution instead of to the University of Alberta. Students are registered in this course for each approved term of study off-campus. The only fees assessed for this registration are the off-campus mandatory non-instructional fees associated with the term. Students are eligible to register in the course on more than one occasion. Closed to web registration.

Abroad, Study Term: Undergraduate

Education Abroad Program

  
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    ABROD 800 - Study Term Abroad


    ★ 0 (fi 0) (either term, unassigned) This course is reserved for students who wish to maintain registration while participating in formal University of Alberta managed and approved Study Abroad programs. Students are registered in this course for each approved term of study abroad. The only fees assessed for this registration are the normal registration and transcript fees associated with the term. Students are eligible to register in the course on more than one occasion. Closed to web registration. Contact the Education Abroad Program, University of Alberta International.

Accounting: Undergraduate

Department of Accounting, Operations and Information Systems
Faculty of Business

Notes

  1. Enrolment in all ACCTG courses, except ACCTG 300 , is restricted to students registered in the Faculty of Business, or to students registered in specified programs that require Business courses to meet degree requirements and who have obtained prior approval of their Faculty.
  2. See also Management Information Systems listing.

  
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    ACCTG 300 - Introduction to Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Provides a basic understanding of accounting: how accounting numbers are generated, the meaning of accounting reports, and how to use accounting reports to make decisions. Note: Not open to students registered in the Faculty of Business. Not for credit in the Bachelor of Commerce Program.
  
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    ACCTG 311 - Introduction to Accounting for Financial Performance


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1.5s-0) How to prepare and interpret financial statements that report to decision makers external to the enterprise, such as shareholders and creditors. Course includes principles and standards of balance sheet valuation, income measurement, financial disclosure and cash flow analysis that link preparation and use of such statements. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102.
  
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    ACCTG 322 - Introduction to Accounting for Management Decision Making


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) In contrast to the external orientation of ACCTG 311, this course focuses on how to prepare and use accounting information for management decision making. Major topics include: the role of corporate goals, planning and control concepts, how costs behave and how to analyze and manage them, budgeting and performance measures. Prerequisite: ACCTG 311.
  
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    ACCTG 412 - Financial Reporting for Managers and Analysts


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Course is for students who are not accounting majors and is especially useful for those contemplating a career in financial management or a CFA designation. It is for students who want to build on the financial accounting knowledge developed in ACCTG 311, and provides the necessary foundation for courses in financial statement analysis and tax. Further depth is provided in balance sheet valuation, income measurement, earnings per share and cash flow analysis. Prerequisite: ACCTG 311. Corequisite: FIN 301. Not open to students with credit in ACCTG 414 or 415.
  
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    ACCTG 414 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) First of two courses covering principles, methods and applications of current and proposed Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Emphasizes accounting for operating and investment assets, and related income measurement and disclosure. Prerequisites: ACCTG 311 and 322. Not open to students with credit in ACCTG 412. There is a consolidated exam for ACCTG 414.
  
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    ACCTG 415 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Second of two courses (see ACCTG 414) covering principles, methods and applications of current and proposed Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Emphasizes accounting for financing, liabilities and equity, related income measurement and disclosure, and cash flow. Prerequisites: FIN 301, and a minimum grade of C- in ACCTG 414 or 412.
  
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    ACCTG 416 - Accounting Theory and Current Issues


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Major concepts and current issues in accounting thought are examined in an interactive setting. Topics include: the conceptual framework, standard-setting, concepts of income and value, accounting's role in capital markets and in contracts such as for lending and compensation, and recent and emerging issues related to financial and managerial accounting information. Prerequisites: ACCTG 414 or 412; FIN 301. Open only to fourth-year Business students, or by consent of the Department Chair. There is a consolidated exam for ACCTG 416.
  
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    ACCTG 418 - Advanced Financial Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The course analyzes the concepts and practices underlying financial reporting in more complex areas such as business combinations, multinational operations, future income taxes and not for profit organizations. Prerequisite: ACCTG 415. Open only to fourth-year Business students or by consent of the Department Chair.
  
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    ACCTG 424 - Intermediate Management Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Emphasizes mastery of techniques for implementation and evaluation of cost systems for management and decision making. Cost issues include: accumulating and analyzing costs using actual, standard and activity-based approaches, overhead allocation and cost estimation. Management topics include: pricing, production and investment decisions, revenue analysis, performance evaluation, management incentive systems and strategy analysis. Linear programming and multiple regression may be used. Prerequisites: ACCTG 322 and MGTSC 312. There is a consolidated exam for ACCTG 424.
  
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    ACCTG 426 - Management Control Systems


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Current research and cases in accounting and control with a particular focus on strategy, governance and control processes in modern organizations. Topics include: control system design (including governance and audit), responsibility accounting, performance management, and strategic management accounting. Prerequisite: ACCTG 424. Open only to fourth year Business students, or by consent of Department Chair.
  
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    ACCTG 432 - Financial Statement Analysis I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) May be taken on its own or as the first of a two-course sequence that develops student competence in using financial information. Using case analysis, students learn to value a firm through the use of a five-step process: (1) examination of firm's industry, markets and strategy, (2) evaluation of firm's accounting policies and their impact on the financial reports, (3) applying fundamental analysis to assess financial strengths and weaknesses, (4) forecasting future earnings and cash flows, and (5) applying valuation models. Corequisites: ACCTG 415 or 412.
  
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    ACCTG 437 - Accounting Information Systems


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) An introduction to the field of computerized accounting information systems in organizations: basic transaction processing, record updating and maintenance, and financial and managerial reporting functions. Concentrates on the scope of accounting information systems in organizations; impacts of computerized accounting information systems on the role of the professional accountants; design issues for accounting information systems: security, accuracy, integrity, recovery, and operational control issues relating to accounting information systems; and impacts of computerized accounting information systems on the auditing processes in organizations. Prerequisites: ACCTG 311, 322, MIS 311. Credit may be granted for only one of ACCTG 437 or MIS 437.
  
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    ACCTG 456 - Assurance on Financial Information


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Focuses on the external auditor's provision of assurance services on financial information. Topics include: society's demand for various assurance services; the role, profession, ethics, independence and liability of the assurance provider; assurance risk and strategy; assurance planning, operations and reports; computerization and internal control; and emerging assurance services. Prerequisite: ACCTG 414 or 412.
  
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    ACCTG 463 - Accounting for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course covers accounting rules and practice in the area of natural resources, energy and the environment. Some topics include mineral rights and exploration costs, emissions trading, environmental reporting and liabilities. While it does contain technical material, it is meant for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both International and U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) will be explored. The focus will be on understanding how firms in this area report their natural resource assets and related liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCTG 311. ACCTG 412 or 414 are recommended.
  
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    ACCTG 467 - Basic Income Tax


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examines the concepts, regulations and interpretations underlying individual and corporate income tax from the tax professional's perspective. Topics include: structure of the Income Tax Act, residency requirements, employment income, business and property income, capital gains, and the calculation of tax payable for individuals. Tax planning is introduced and opportunities for tax planning are identified where appropriate as topics are covered. Prerequisite: ACCTG 414 or 412.
  
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    ACCTG 468 - Corporate Taxation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) A study of the major tax concepts behind the specific provisions of the Income Tax Act in the taxation of corporations, corporate distributions and transactions between corporations and their shareholders. Emphasis on applying the Act in practical problems and case settings. Prerequisite: ACCTG 467.
  
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    ACCTG 480 - Accounting Honors Seminar Part I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This is primarily a case-based course that covers the preparation of integrated pro forma financial statements and their use in making financial decisions, as well as selected other topics in financial accounting. Topics will vary from year to year with case selection, and may include (but are not necessarily limited to) the areas of revenue recognition, cash flow analysis, intangible assets, asset impairment, inter-corporate investments, hybrid debt securities, leases, pensions, and equity-based compensation. While the course contains sufficient technical material to ensure familiarity with the financial reporting issues discussed, the main emphasis of the course will be on the interpretation and use of financial information for purposes of decision making. Prerequisites: ACCTG 415, FIN 301
  
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    ACCTG 481 - Accounting Honors Seminar Part II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course covers 3 topic areas: (1) History of accounting thought including coverage of current standard setting activities, (2) Professionalism in accounting including exposure to current practical issues requiring professional judgment, and (3) Exposure to current accounting research and design of research studies. Prerequisite: ACCTG 415.
  
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    ACCTG 488 - Selected Topics in Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Acceptable as a Group A elective in the Major in Accounting. Normally restricted to third- and fourth-year Business students. Prerequisites: ACCTG 311, 322 or consent of Department. Additional prerequisites may be required.
  
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    ACCTG 495 - Individual Research Project I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Special Study for advanced undergraduates. May be considered as a Group A or Group B elective at the discretion of the Department. Prerequisites: consent of Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program.
  
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    ACCTG 496 - Individual Research Project II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Special Study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: ACCTG 495, consent of the Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program.
  
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    ACCTG 497 - Individual Research Project III


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Special Study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: ACCTG 496, consent of the Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program.

Accounting: Graduate

  
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    ACCTG 501 - Introduction to Financial Reporting and Analysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Accounting information's role in recording and reporting on economic and business events including the primary financial statements: balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow. Concepts and purposes underlying financial reporting. Selection of accounting policies and their informational effects for external users. The course begins to develop students' abilities to evaluate and interpret financial information through basic financial analysis.
  
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    ACCTG 523 - Accounting Information and Internal Decision Making


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Accounting concepts used by managers in planning and decision-making. The course introduces concepts of cost and profit behavior, contribution margin, and activity-based costing, as well as relevant costs and revenues for production, marketing and capital budgeting decisions. The course also introduces students to the management planning and control system and its components - budgets, variance analysis, performance evaluation in centralized and decentralized organizations, and management compensation plans. The importance of designing a system to fit the organizations' strategy is emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCTG 501.
  
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    ACCTG 601 - Case Studies in Accounting


    ★ 4.5 (fi 9) (either term, 3-0-0) Develops students' competence in analyzing case studies in financial and managerial accounting. Topics covered include identification of financial and managerial reporting needs, preparation of financial reports, planning budgeting and forecasting, governance, and enterprise risk management. Open to students enrolled in the MAcc program only.
  
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    ACCTG 610 - Financial Reporting for Managers and Analysts


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Intended for students who would like to build on the financial accounting knowledge developed in ACCTG 501, and is especially useful for those contemplating a career in financial management. Useful both as a stand-alone course and as a foundation for further study in financial statement analysis. Provides further depth in balance sheet valuation and income measurement in order to enhance students' ability to use financial accounting as a management tool. Prerequisite: ACCTG 501. Corequisite: FIN 501 or 503. Students may receive credit for only two of the following three courses: ACCTG 610, 614 and 615.
  
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    ACCTG 614 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) First of two courses covering the theory, methods, strengths, and weaknesses of current Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Prerequisite: ACCTG 501. Students may receive credit for only two of ACCTG 610, 614, and 615.
  
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    ACCTG 615 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Second of two courses covering theory, methods, strengths, and weaknesses of current Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Prerequisite: ACCTG 614. Students may receive credit for only two of the following three courses: ACCTG 610, 614, and 615.
  
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    ACCTG 616 - Seminar in Financial Accounting Theory


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The theory and propositions underlying current financial accounting practices and alternative theories of accounting measurement as proposed in the literature. The function of accounting in relation to the decision processes of the principal external users of accounting data is considered. Prerequisites: ACCTG 614 or 610, FIN 501 or 503.
  
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    ACCTG 618 - Seminar in Advanced Accounting Issues


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The application of accounting methods to incorporate investments and other advanced topics in financial reporting. Prerequisites: ACCTG 615.
  
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    ACCTG 624 - Seminar in Management Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Seminar consisting of topics concerned at an advanced level with generating and using accounting and related data in the planning and control functions of organizations. Prerequisite: ACCTG 523.
  
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    ACCTG 625 - Performance Management


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Addresses advanced topics in performance management including identification of organizational reporting systems to meet strategic goals, cost management, and measurement of performance on both an organizational and individual level. Open to students enrolled in the MAcc program only.
  
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    ACCTG 626 - Seminar in Managerial Control


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Current research and cases in managerial accounting. Prerequisites: ACCTG 523.
  
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    ACCTG 630 - Financial Statement Analysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Develops students' competence in analyzing financial statements and using financial information to make investment decisions, both equity and debt. The primary thrust of the course is aimed at equity investments. Students learn a five step process of analysis for equity investments: (1) An examination of the firm's industry, markets and strategy, (2) An evaluation of the firm's accounting policies and their impact on the financial reports, (3) Applying fundamental analysis to assess financial strengths and weaknesses, (4) Forecasting future earnings and cash flows, and (5) Applying valuation models to assess the current price. A comparable process for lending decisions is then developed. Prerequisite: ACCTG 501. Corequisite: FIN 501 or 503.
  
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    ACCTG 656 - Auditing History, Theory, and Current Thought


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Focuses on the external auditor's provision of assurance services on financial information. Topics include: society's demand for various assurance services; the role, profession, ethics, independence and liability of the assurance provider; assurance risk and strategy; assurance planning, operations and reports; computerization and internal control; and emerging assurance services. Prerequisite: ACCTG 614 or 610.
  
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    ACCTG 657 - Advanced Auditing


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Covers advanced topics in internal control/audit, external assurance engagements, audit and assurance service planning, and preparation of financial reports. Analysis of accounting policies and transactions and the role of audit committees and other corporate governance mechanisms will be discussed. Open to students enrolled in the MAcc program only.
  
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    ACCTG 662 - Strategic Tax Planning


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The course provides a general economic background to embed the consideration of tax provisions in organizational decision-making. The concepts learnt should be applicable and transferable to different tax regimes. Applications include showing how better decisions can be made by applying tax planning concepts and knowledge of specific tax regimes to investment decisions, compensation planning, choice of organizational form, and mergers and acquisitions. International tax planning is also covered.
  
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    ACCTG 663 - Accounting for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course covers accounting rules and practice in the area of natural resources, energy and the environment. Some topics include mineral rights and exploration costs, emissions trading, environmental reporting and liabilities. While it does contain technical material, it is meant for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both International and U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) will be explored. The focus will be on understanding how firms in this area report their natural resource assets and related liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCTG 501.
  
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    ACCTG 667 - Basic Income Tax


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examines the concepts, regulations and interpretations underlying individual and corporate income tax from the tax professional's perspective. Topics include: structure of the Income Tax Act, residency requirements, employment income, business and property income, capital gains, and the calculation of tax payable for individuals. Tax planning is introduced and opportunities for tax planning are identified where appropriate as topics are covered. Prerequisite: ACCTG 614 or 610.
  
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    ACCTG 668 - Corporate Taxation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) A study of the major tax concepts behind the specific provisions of the Income Tax Act in the taxation of corporations, corporate distributions and transactions between corporations and their shareholders. Emphasis on applying the Act in practical problems and case settings. Prerequisite: ACCTG 667.
  
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    ACCTG 686 - Selected Topics in Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Topics may vary from year to year. Students should check with the MBA Office for pre/corequisites of specific sections.
  
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    ACCTG 688 - CPA Capstone 1


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Covers topics as required for the Capstone 1 module of the CPA Professional Education Program. Open to students enrolled in the MAcc program only.
  
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    ACCTG 689 - CPA Capstone 2


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (either term, 3-0-0) Covers topics as required for the Capstone 2 module of the CPA Professional Education Program. Open to students enrolled in the MAcc program only.
  
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    ACCTG 701 - The Methodological Foundations of Accounting Research


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Because the practice of accounting and the use of accounting information are complex and multifaceted, a wide variety of research approaches provide an understanding of accounting. These approaches are primarily in the social sciences, but also in mathematics and some of the humanities, such as history and philosophy. The purpose of this course is to examine some of the fundamental ideas and concepts underlying the research process in accounting. It focuses on the philosophy of the social sciences, since they provide the core of theory and methods for accounting research. Topics include the objectives of social science research; the nature and role of theories; the relationship between facts and values; theory construction, testing, falsification and inference; positivist vs. non-positivist methods; social studies of science and scientists; and research ethics (including research involving human subjects). The emphasis is on the scientific method broadly construed and applied, rather than on specific techniques. Open to all doctoral students or with written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students.
  
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    ACCTG 703 - Accounting Research Workshop


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (two term, 3-0-0) Based on the Department's research workshop program, this course will discuss research methodology as it applies to accounting and ensure students learn how to review/evaluate current research and literature. Students are expected to present their own research and to analyze the research of others. This workshop is a single term course offered over two terms. Students are expected to attend regularly throughout their doctoral program, but register for credit in their second year (prior to taking accounting comprehensive examination).
  
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    ACCTG 705 - Individual Research


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0)
  
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    ACCTG 706 - Behavioral Research in Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) A generalist course on research that is primarily oriented to individual behavior in accounting settings. Topics covered will include individual cognitive processes and limitations, the experimental method, and a broad survey of experimental studies (drawing on psychology and economics) conducted in accounting settings. Open to all doctoral students or with the written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students.
  
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    ACCTG 708 - Introduction to Financial Economics Based Research in Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) An introductory course on research that examines the role of accounting information in market economies and organizations. Topics covered will vary, but will include the theory and developments underlying financial economic research and a broad survey of empirical and analytical studies conducted in accounting settings. Open to all doctoral students or with the written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students.
  
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    ACCTG 711 - Seminar on Judgement and Decision Making Research in Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Judgement and Decision Making research draws on theories in psychology, economics, statistics and cognitive science to examine issues in accounting and auditing. Reviews work on a range of issues such as accountability, fraud detection, accounting policy choice, the effect of discretion in accounting rules on decisions made by managers, investors and auditors, and how well auditors can assess the knowledge and/or preferences of other agents. Students may conduct an empirical study (e.g., an experiment, survey, simulation or case study) as part of the course. Some literature in behavioral finance and marketing may also be covered. Pre or corequisite: MGTSC 705 (or equivalent). Open to all doctoral students or with the written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students.
  
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    ACCTG 732 - Analytical Research in Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Develops an information economics framework for understanding the role of accounting information in financial markets and in organizations. Involves significant microeconomics, game theory, and mathematics. Pre- or corequisite: ACCTG 731 or equivalent. Open to all doctoral students or with written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students.
  
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    ACCTG 800 - Financial Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Reporting of financial results of operations and financial positions to investors and managers; the use of accounting information for decision making. Restricted to students registered in the MBA China Program.
  
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    ACCTG 801 - Organizational Planning and Control


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Implementing financial performance measurement, evaluation and control systems, and organizational designs that enhance performance; understanding organizational structures and processes. Restricted to students registered in the MBA China Program.
  
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    ACCTG 812 - Financial Reporting for Managers and Analysts


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Useful both as a stand-alone course and as a foundation for further study in financial statement analysis. Provides further depth in balance sheet valuation and income measurement in order to enhance students' ability to use financial accounting as a management tool. Restricted to students registered in the MFM Program.
  
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    ACCTG 818 - FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Develops students' competence in analyzing financial statements and using financial information to make investment decisions, both equity and debt. The primary thrust of the course is aimed at equity investments. Students learn a five step process of analysis for equity investments: (1) An examination of the firm's industry, markets and strategy, (2) An evaluation of the firm's accounting policies and their impact on the financial reports, (3) Applying fundamental analysis to assess financial strengths and weaknesses, (4) Forecasting future earnings and cash flows, and (5) Applying valuation models to assess the current price. A comparable process for lending decisions is then developed. Restricted to students registered in the MFM Program.
  
  •  

    ACCTG 820 - Financial Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 32) (either term, 3-0-0) Reporting of financial results of operations and financial positions to investors and managers; the use of accounting information for decision making. Restricted to Executive MBA students only.
  
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    ACCTG 830 - Organization Planning and Control


    ★ 3 (fi 32) (either term, 3-0-0) Implementing financial performance measurement, evaluation and control systems, and organizational designs that enhance performance; understanding organizational structures and processes. Restricted to Executive MBA students only.

Administration: Cours de 1er cycle

Faculté Saint-Jean

  
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    ADMI 301 - Fondements légaux de l'économie canadienne


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-0-0) Étude synoptique du système légal canadien, mettant l'accent sur les considérations sous-jacentes de politique sociale. Tout en considérant la nature, les sources, et la philosophie du droit, ainsi que les objectifs des politiques qu'il codifie, des sujets choisis dans les champs de la responsabilité civile délictuelle et contractuelle seront analysés. Note: Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour B LAW 301.
  
  •  

    ADMI 302 - Introduction à la finance


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-1s-0) Différents types de titres boursiers et méthodes d'évaluation de base. Évaluation et sélection d'actifs matériels et intellectuels. Fonctionnement et efficience des marchés financiers. Mesures de risque et méthode de réduction du risque. Politique de financement, incluant le choix entre l'endettement et les fonds propres. Note: On s'attend à ce que les étudiants soient familiers avec les logiciels informatiques de base. Préalable(s): STAT 151 ou équivalent. Autres cours préalable(s) ou concomitant(s): MGTSC 312, ACCTG 300 ou ACCTG 311.
  
  •  

    ADMI 311 - Introduction à la comptabilité


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-1.5s-0) Postulats, principes, cycle comptable, calcul du capital et du revenu, préparation et analyse d'un état financier, instance sur les rapports à présenter aux actionnaires et autres agents externes détenant des pouvoirs de décision. Préalable(s): ECONE 101/102. Note: Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ACCTG 311.
  
  •  

    ADMI 322 - Gestion et méthodes de contrôle


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-0-0) Objectifs d'une entreprise, concepts de planification et de contrôle, accumulation des coûts en vue de l'établissement des prix et de l'évaluation du prix de revient des produits. Préalable(s): ADMI 311 ou ACCTG 311. Note: Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ACCTG 322.
  
  •  

    ADMI 342 - Introduction au Commerce International


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-0-0) Introduction aux outils requis pour réussir dans un monde des affaires de plus en plus international. Sert de tremplin à des cours plus avancés en affaires internationales. Les sujets couverts incluent les différences entre les pays, le commerce international, l´investissement direct étranger, l´intégration économique internationale, le marché des changes, et la stratégie et les opérations en affaires internationales. Note : Ce cours n´est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour BUEC 342.
  
  •  

    ADMI 412 - Principes de l'investissement


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-0-0) Ce cours étudie les titres financiers et les marchés financiers avec un accent sur les actions et les obligations. Les sujets traités incluent : l'information, les taux d'intérêt, la relation risque-rendement, les marchés efficients, la diversification, la mesure de la performance des portefeuilles et l'application de la théorie financière aux décisions d'investissement. Préalable(s) : FIN 301 ou ADMI 302, et MGTSC 312. Note : Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour FIN 412, ECON 442 ou ECONE 442.
  
  •  

    ADMI 463 - L'énergie et l'environnement: Structure industrielle, performance et défis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-0-0) Dans ce cours on utilise les outils de l'économique pour obtenir une meilleure compréhension des marchés et de l'industrie de l'énergie. Les différences et similarités entre les industries (pétrole, gaz naturel, électricité, etc.) et entre les différents segments (exploration, production, vente) sont expliquées. On y analyse les grands défis de l'industrie, entre autres la question environnementale et la mondialisation des marchés et les nouvelles formes de la concurrence. On verra comment cette transformation de l'industrie affectera les performances et stratégies de l'industrie. Préalable(s): ECONE 281 ou ECON 281 ou BUEC 311.
  
  •  

    ADMI 479 - L'entreprise et le gouvernement au Canada


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, 3-0-0) Analyse de l'interaction entre l'entreprise et l'administration publique. On s'intéresse en particulier à la dynamique d'ajustement de la firme et du gouvernement dans les changements d'environnement et de politiques. Les motivations et comportements des décideurs publics et des personnes responsables de l'application des mesures sont présentés dans le contexte d'interaction entre les différents groupes impliqués. Sont posées les bases d'une analyse de l'efficacité des différentes politiques, tant fiscales que réglementaires, visant la firme. On y aborde aussi les conséquences des changements de l'environnement économique, technologique et social pour la firme. Préalable(s): ECONE 281 ou BUEC 311. Note: Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour BUEC 479.

Agreement Formal (Registration): Graduate

Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

  
  •  

    AGRMT 903 - Formal Agreement Registration


    ★ 0 (fi 0) (either term, unassigned) This course is reserved for University of Alberta graduate students participating in an approved program administered under a formal agreement between the University of Alberta and other institution(s), who wish to maintain part-time registration at the University of Alberta while studying at an approved partner institution. Closed to web registration. Registration is recommended to the FGSR by the student's home unit.
  
  •  

    AGRMT 906 - Formal Agreement Registration


    ★ 0 (fi 0) (either term, unassigned) This course is reserved for University of Alberta graduate students participating in an approved program administered under a formal agreement between the University of Alberta and other institution(s), who wish to maintain full-time registration in the Spring and Summer terms at the University of Alberta while studying at an approved partner institution. Closed to web registration. Registration is recommended to the FGSR by the student's home unit.
  
  •  

    AGRMT 909 - Formal Agreement Registration


    ★ 0 (fi 0) (either term, unassigned) This course is reserved for University of Alberta graduate students participating in an approved program administered under a formal agreement between the University of Alberta and other institution(s), who wish to maintain full-time registration at the University of Alberta while studying at an approved partner institution. Closed to web registration. Registration is recommended to the FGSR by the student's home unit.

Agricultural and Resource Economics: Undergraduate

Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology
Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

Notes

  1. Before 2003-2004, Agricultural and Resource Economics courses (AREC) were listed as Agricultural Economics (AG EC).
  2. See also Environmental and Conservation Sciences (ENCS), Forest Economics (FOREC), Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Courses (INT D) and Rural Sociology (R SOC) listings for related courses.

  
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    AREC 173 - The Plate, the Planet and Society


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) A cornerstone course that provides an introduction to social perspectives on everything from what we eat for breakfast to how we protect endangered species and agricultural landscapes. Topics covered include current issues around food production and consumption and issues related to sustainability of our natural and social systems. Debates over new technologies (e.g., GMOs, nanotechnology), food, environment, and health can only be understood in the context of political, economic and personal decisions.
  
  •  

    AREC 200 - Current Economic Issues for Agriculture and Food


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Applications of economic principles to problems and current issues relating to agriculture, food and the environment. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or consent of Department.
  
  •  

    AREC 214 - Applications of Linear Models to Food, Resources and the Environment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-2) An introduction to methods and tools that are used to solve linear quantitative problems. Emphasis is on the use of these techniques for economic analysis in applications related to agriculture, food, forestry, and the environment. Classroom examples, laboratory assignments and computer tutorials are provided to give practice in applying quantitative tools to empirical problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1.
  
  •  

    AREC 250 - Social and Economic Issues of Food Biotechnology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course will provide an introduction to the economics and business concepts in the biotechnology industry with an emphasis on food produced using genetic modification and other food technologies. The basic science behind GM foods will be discussed, but most of the material will focus on the social, economic, environmental, and legal issues surrounding GM foods. Key questions will be addressed using peer-reviewed literature and case studies, and the material will be presented from various disciplinary viewpoints.
  
  •  

    AREC 313 - Statistical Analysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-2) Analysis of economic data relating to renewable resource sectors including agriculture, food, forestry, and the environment; collection of data, sampling methods, tests of hypotheses, index numbers, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation; time series analysis. Prerequisite: Introductory statistics course.
  
  •  

    AREC 323 - Introduction to Management for Agri-Food, Environmental, and Forestry Businesses


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Principles and practical aspects of business management, and their relevance to the managing businesses involved in a variety of industries, including agriculture, environment, food, and forestry. Topics include business planning and organizing, and issues related to the management of financial, physical, and human resources. Prerequisite: ECON 101.
  
  •  

    AREC 333 - Economics of Production and Resource Management


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-2) Application of economic concepts and introduction of management tools related to production decision-making for resource-based businesses. Integration of biophysical and environmental relationships with economic objectives in allocating resources. Introduction to quantitative tools used in applied production management decision-making. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, or ECON 281.
  
  •  

    AREC 365 - Natural Resource Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Economics of natural resources; resource scarcity, conservation, sustainability, water resource issues, fisheries, forestry, agriculture, recycling, property and tenure institutions, and public resource policy. Not to be taken if credit received for ECON 365. Prerequisite: ECON 101.
  
  •  

    AREC 375 - World Food and Agriculture


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Economic issues in international agriculture including the world food problem, agricultural development; agricultural and food trade and policy and selected agricultural biotechnology issues. Selected international applications and issues are stressed. Not to be taken if credit received for INT D 303. Prerequisite: ECON 101.
  
  •  

    AREC 382 - Economics of Food Systems, Distribution and Supply Chains


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Application of economic concepts and introduction to issues in international food systems, distribution and farm-to-plate supply chains, including modern retailing and branding, competition, product innovation and food technology, vertical coordination and agri-food trade, governance, private assurance mechanisms and food policy. Selected case study applications and current topics are discussed. Prerequisite: ECON 101.
  
  •  

    AREC 384 - Food Market Analysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1) Applications of price and market theories to marketing problems and issues for food and agricultural products. Topics include: market structures and marketing functions; price analysis; futures markets; economics of food safety and quality; and international food marketing. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, or ECON 281.
  
  •  

    AREC 400 - Special Topics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Individual study of a selected topic or problem supervised by a Faculty member, requiring preparation of written reports. Prerequisite: consent of the Department Chair.
  
  •  

    AREC 410 - Advanced Methods and Applications in Applied Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Empirical applications of methods used in resource, environmental, agri-food, and forest economics. Involves one or more case study projects that focus on the empirical examination of economic issues in renewable resource management. Prerequisite: AREC 313. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
  •  

    AREC 423 - Advanced Management Methods and Applications for Agri-Food, Environmental and Forestry Businesses


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0) Empirical applications of management and research methods used by business managers. Emphasis is given to integrating economic and business management concepts with applications to problems and issues in agriculture, food, the environment and forestry. Prerequisite: AREC 313. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
  •  

    AREC 430 - Economic Impact Assessment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Examination of the theory and application of economic assessment methods with a focus on the evaluation of environmental, agricultural and natural resource projects, regulatory policy, and planning. Includes case studies of recent project and policy proposals to illustrate the methods used to evaluate economic benefits and costs of such proposals. Applications to estimating private economic benefits. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, or ECON 281.
  
  •  

    AREC 433 - Financial Management in Resource Industries


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) Recent theoretical and empirical developments in finance are applied to natural resource industries including agribusiness, farming, forestry and food. Emphasis on capital budgeting, financial risk, and associated topics for long run investment planning in smaller business enterprises. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, ECON 281, or FIN 301.
  
  •  

    AREC 460 - Land Use Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) This course introduces concepts and methods employed in the economics of land use and land use change. Topics include: theoretical and empirical analysis of determinants and drivers of land use and land use change; environmental and socioeconomic consequences of land use change; the role of governments in managing land use decisions; and spatial analysis in land use research. Prerequisite: ECON 101 and (AREC 313, ECON 399, or STAT 378).
  
  •  

    AREC 465 - Advanced Natural Resource Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Applied economic modeling of resource utilization and environmental issues with a focus in forestry and agriculture. Topics may include current Canadian and international issues in the area of environmental valuation, energy, climate change, biodiversity and conservation as related to Forestry and Agriculture. Prerequisite: AREC 365. AREC 313 and ECON 281 recommended.
  
  •  

    AREC 471 - Society and Well-Being


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Economic, political, historical, and legal perspectives on how and why governments promote well-being in areas such as food safety, nutritional policy, consumer protection, recreation, and the workplace. Topics include the historical development of wellness-related policies, how these decisions are made in society, and economic and moral justifications for such interventions. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 363, ECON 281, or ECON 365.
  
  •  

    AREC 473 - Food and Agricultural Policies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Economics of public policy for agriculture and food industries. Public choice principles and institutions. Farm and food policy in Canada and selected countries. Case studies on price and output policy; agricultural trade; food safety and quality; resource use and environmental sustainability; and/or rural change/restructuring. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, ECON 281, or ECON 365.
  
  •  

    AREC 482 - Cooperatives and Alternative Business Institutions


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) The impact of agri-food and resource market structures on market conduct and performance; the impact of market structure on selection of cooperative versus investor owned firms including differences in firm objectives, performance and management incentives; topics may also include effects of firm type on community development and policy formation. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, or ECON 281.
  
  •  

    AREC 484 - Strategic Management in Food and Resource Businesses


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Analysis of strategic management concepts and applications to agri-food and resource industries. The development of business and corporate strategies including competitive positioning; sustaining competitive advantage; vertical coordination and strategic alliances in value chains; corporate diversification and global business strategy. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 323, AREC 365, or ECON 281.
  
  •  

    AREC 485 - Trade and Globalization in Food and Resources


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) Principles and policies affecting international trade in food, forestry and natural resources. Current issues in trade, including fair trade concerns, trade in capital and services, effects of food safety and quality standards, and environmental issues surrounding trade agreements and institutions. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, ECON 365, or R SOC 355.
  
  •  

    AREC 487 - Managing Market Risk in Resource Industries


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of the mechanics and economic functions of commodity futures and options derivative markets. Topics include the theory and practice of hedging, price formation and issues unique to commodities. Emphasis on concepts and analysis to evaluate derivative markets; use of derivatives to manage market risk in agribusiness, forestry and other resource businesses. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, ECON 281, or FIN 301.
  
  •  

    AREC 488 - Introduction to Agricultural and Resource Game Theory


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Game theory analyzes situations in which payoffs to agents depend on the behavior of other agents. Basics of game theoretic analysis are introduced. Applications to the agri-food and resource industries are discussed. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, or ECON 281.

Agricultural and Resource Economics: Graduate

Notes

  1. See also INT D 565  for a course offered by more than one Department or Faculty and which may be taken as an option or as a course.
  2. Undergraduate AREC courses at the 400-level may be taken for credit by graduate students in Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.

  
  •  

    AREC 500 - Special Topics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Individual study or special topics course in agricultural and resource economics under the supervision of a Faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of Department Chair.
  
  •  

    AREC 502 - Advanced Price Analysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Principles of consumer demand and producer supply analysis including theoretical and empirical approaches to the analysis of consumer and producer choice. Applications include food demand analysis (single equations and systems approaches), price expectations and producer supply decisions, market model simulation and policy evaluation, and economic welfare measurement. Corequisite: ECON 481.
  
  •  

    AREC 513 - Econometric Applications


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Econometric theory, multiple linear regression analysis and interpretation, simultaneous equation estimation, qualitative choice models, time series analysis, applications of econometric techniques to resource and agricultural economic problems. Prerequisite: Intermediate course in statistics or econometrics.
  
  •  

    AREC 530 - Economic Impact Assessment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) Examination of the theory and application of economic assessment methods with a focus on the evaluation of environmental, agricultural and natural resource projects, regulatory policy, and planning. Includes case studies of recent project and policy proposals to illustrate the methods used to evaluate economic benefits and costs of such proposals. Applications to estimating private economic benefits. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 430. Prerequisite: AREC 200, AREC 365, or ECON 281, or consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    AREC 533 - Production Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Static and dynamic firm theory, production principles applied to resource use, resource and product combination, cost structure, uncertainty and expectations. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. AREC 313 and ECON 481 recommended.
  
  •  

    AREC 560 - Land Use Economics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0) This course introduces concepts and methods employed in the economics of land use and land use change. Topics include: theoretical and empirical analysis of determinants and drivers of land use and land use change; environmental and socioeconomic consequences of land use change; the role of governments in managing land use decisions; and spatial analysis in land use research. Not to be taken if credit received for AREC 460. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and (AREC 313, STAT 378, or ECON 399), or consent of instructor.
 

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