May 08, 2021  
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 
    
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Listings


 

Details of Courses

Courses taught at the University of Alberta are listed alphabetically. All courses, except those taught by Faculté Saint-Jean, are described in English.

Each course is designated by its computer abbreviation and a number. Students should use this abbreviation and number when completing any form requiring this information.

Courses are numbered according to the following system:

000-099 Pre-University
100-199 Basic Undergraduate. Normally requires no university-level prerequisites. Designed typically for students in the first year of a program.
200-299 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 100-level. Designed typically for students in the second year of a program.
300-399 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 200-level. Designed typically for students in the third year of a program.
400-499 Advanced Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 300-level. Designed typically for students in the fourth year of a program.
500-599 Graduate. Designated for graduate students and certain advanced or honors undergraduate students in their final year.
600-799 Graduate Courses
800-899 Special Registrations
900-999 Graduate Thesis and Project Numbers

For the purposes of program descriptions and prerequisite designation, courses numbered 100-199 are designated as Junior Courses and courses numbered 200-499 are designated as Senior Courses.

Note: Some exceptions to the course number system described above have been granted to the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.

Course Description Symbols and Figures

Several symbols and figures are used to indicate the type, duration, and weight of courses.

  1. ★—Indicates “units of course weight,” and usually follows the course title. The accompanying number indicates the weight of the course as used in computing grade point averages and for meeting degree requirements.
    A course which runs throughout the Fall/Winter (i.e., from September through April) is usually weighted ★6. A course that runs for only one term (i.e., Fall: from September to December, or Winter: from January through April) is usually weighted ★3. Certain courses are offered over Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer, or in one term, with weights of ★1, ★2, and ★4. These are considered as one-sixth, one-third, and two-thirds of a Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer course, respectively. Some honors and graduate courses involving research may vary in weight according to the length and difficulty of the project. Some clinical courses may vary in weight according to the length of clinical experience. Some courses, not included in the computation of grade point averages, are offered for credit only and either carry a weight of ★0, or are marked as “Credit.”
    Undergraduate students who take courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering but are not registered in Engineering will have a course weight assigned for these courses according to the protocol of their home Faculty.
  2. fi—Denotes: “fee index,” the value used to calculate the instructional fees for each course. The fee index is multiplied by the fee index value (given in the appropriate subsection of Fees Payment Guide ) to give the dollar value of instructional fees for the course.
    For normal courses, the fee index is twice the value of the units of course weight; for example, a course with ★3 normally has fi 6. In cases where exceptional fees considerations need to be made, the fee index is set differently by the Board of Governors.
    Note that certain programs (e.g., MD, DDS, etc.) are assessed on a program fee basis for all or certain years. In these cases, the fee index calculation does not apply.
  3. (x term, a-b-c)—These figures in parentheses give information on when the course is offered and the hours of instruction required by the course in a week, or in some cases the total time in a term.
    In the case of a single-term course, the term in which the course is given is mentioned (item x). The designation “either term” means that the course may be offered either in the first term or in the second term or in each term, at the discretion of the department concerned. The designation “variable” means that the course may be taught either as a single-term or as a full-session course.
    Item a indicates lecture hours. Item b indicates seminar hour(s), demonstration hours (d), clinic hours (c), or lecture-laboratory hours (L). Item c indicates laboratory hours. For two-term courses, the hours of instruction are the same in both terms unless otherwise indicated. The expression 3/2 means 3 hours of instruction every second week; 2s/2 means 2 seminar hours every second week.
    Examples:
    (first term, 3-0-3): a course taught in first term with 3 hours lecture, no seminar, and 3 hours lab per week.
    (second term, 0-1s-2): a course taught in second term with no lectures, 1 seminar hour, and 2 hours of lab per week.
    (either term, 3-0-0): a course taught in either first or second term, or each term, with 3 lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
    (two-term, 3-0-3): a course taught over both first and second term with three lecture hours, no seminar, and three hours lab per week.
    (variable, 3-0-0): a course which may be taught in either first or second term or over two terms with three lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
  4. Prerequisite—This provides information on courses which must be successfully completed before registering in the more advanced course.
    Corequisite—This provides information on courses which must be taken before or at the same time as the course described in the listing.
    Note: Departments are authorized to cancel the registration of those students registered in a course offered by the department if they do not meet the prerequisite and/or corequisite requirements stated in the course description in this Calendar.
  5. [Department]— This indicates the department responsible for registration for interdepartmental courses. Normally, courses will be credited to the discipline listed in the square brackets.
  6. Open Studies Courses—Courses that are available to Open Studies students are designated in Bear Tracks Course Catalog by the  symbol.  indicates that a course is available to Open Studies students on a delayed registration basis only (see Registration  for complete details).  To browse courses that have been approved for Open Studies students, see Open Studies Course Listings on the Office of the Registrar website.
Important: Registration Procedures for Two-Term Courses

Students are strongly advised to refer to the Registration and Courses menu at www.registrarsoffice.ualberta.ca for details. Two-term courses are normally offered over two terms (either Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer). In a few instances, two-term courses are offered within a single term. In all cases these are identifiable in the Class Schedule because they consist of part A and part B (e.g., English 111A and 111B).

To successfully register in a two-term course, students, must do the following:

  • Register in both the part A and part B for all types of sections offered (Lectures, Labs, Seminars, etc.);
  • Register in the same section numbers for part A and part B of a course (e.g., Lecture A1 for both part A and part B, and Lab E3 for both part A and part B);
  • Register in all the appropriate sections on the same day.

All of the above must be done or the course registration is invalid and will be deleted. Invalid registrations will be deleted nightly. It is the student’s responsibility to attempt the course registration again, subject to availability.

Example: A student wishes to register in ABCD 101, a two-term course. It has a lecture and a lab section. Based on the student’s timetable planning, decides to take Lecture C3 and Lab C8. The student must add

In Fall Term ABCD 101A Lec C3 and ABCD 101A Lab C8,
and  
In Winter Term ABCD 101B Lec C3 and ABCD 101B Lab C8.

All these sections must be added on the same day to successfully register. Otherwise the registration in ABCD 101 will be deleted overnight and the student’s place in the course will be lost.

Course Renumbering

Over the years many courses have been renumbered. Old numbers can be found within individual course listings of previous Calendar editions.

Courses on Reserve

Courses not offered in the past four years are removed from this Calendar and placed on Reserve. These courses may be taught again in the future, in which case they would be brought back into the active Course Listings and placed in the Calendar. Information about Reserve Courses is available through the Registrar’s Office, the University Secretariat, and Faculty Offices.

Faculty Specific Regulations Regarding Courses

For specific Faculty regulations relating to courses and for a complete list of subjects taught by a Faculty, please consult the Undergraduate Programs section of the Calendar at the end of each Faculty section.

Physical Requirements for University Courses

The University has a commitment to the education of all academically qualified students and special services are frequently provided on campus to assist disabled students.

Nevertheless, some courses make certain unavoidable demands on students with respect to the possession of a certain level of physical skill or ability if the academic objectives of the course are to be realized. In case of doubt, students are advised to contact the Department concerned and Student Accessibility Disability Services (SAS), Office of the Dean of Students.

Because support services cannot be guaranteed for all off-campus courses, instructors may be obliged to refuse registration in such courses.

Course Availability

The following is a comprehensive course listing of all the approved courses that the University of Alberta may offer. The appearance of a course in this list does not guarantee that the course will actually be offered. The most current information on courses is available on Bear Tracks at https://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca

Course Listings

 

Augustana Faculty - Environmental Studies: Undergraduate

Department of Science
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUENV 344 - Environmental Psychology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Systematic study of the dynamic interchange between people and their social and physical environmental contexts. Topics include theories of environmental perception, the effects of crowding, the impact of natural/urban settings, the effects of building design and colours, and managing limited resources. Prerequisites: AUPSY 102 (2016) or AUPSY 103; third-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 344 and AUPSY 344.
  
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    AUENV 345 - Religion and Ecology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course examines the complexities and tensions in formulating religious responses to environmental problems. It looks at how eco justice, stewardship, ecological spirituality, and ecofeminism integrate Christian traditions with environmental responsibility. It also devotes substantial time to outlining the ways place-based identities address issues related to colonialism, environmental racism, technology and community. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 345 and AUREL 345.
  
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    AUENV 350 - Conservation Theory and Biodiversity in Tropical Systems


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Introduction to the basic concepts of conservation biology. The scope of conservation biology and levels of biodiversity are explored, as are aspects of tropical ecology related to conservation. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253 and consent of the instructor(s) based on successful completion of the selection process. Note: This course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUBIO 459 or AUENV 459. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 350 and AUBIO 350.
  
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    AUENV 354 - Freshwater Ecology and Management


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Introduction to the biological, chemical and physical features of freshwater ecosystems, and how they relate to ecological processes in and adjacent to aquatic systems. The course will examine the role of ecological patterns in lakes, ponds, rivers and streams, with an emphasis on freshwater systems and their management in western Canada. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 354, AUBIO 354, and AUGEO 354. The course requires participation in a field trip. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUENV 355 - Philosophy, Technology, and the Environment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Investigation of the philosophical and social issues related to technology and the environment. The natural/artificial distinction, different senses of "environment" and the ways we understand, package, and manage nature form the foundation of the course. Issues in environmental ethics are also addressed. Thinkers may include Marx, Heidegger, Marcel, Borgmann, Winner, Singer, Regan, and others. Prerequisite: None, but AUPHI 350 would be useful. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 355 and AUPHI 355.
  
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    AUENV 358 - Environmental Sociology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Theoretical and empirical examination of the connection between the natural environment and the social world. This involves inquiry into the sociological dimensions of some major contemporary environmental problems, including air, water and soil pollution, decreased biodiversity, deforestation, climate change, and ozone depletion. Particular attention is paid to the social and political connections among issues of industrialization, development, globalization, inequality, gender, social change and environmental destruction. Prerequisites: Third-year standing and AUENV 120 (or its crosslisted equivalent). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 358 and AUSOC 358.
  
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    AUENV 365 - Storied Landscapes


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) What stories do landscapes tell humans? What consequences do climate change, digital spaces and biotechnology have on how humans receive and preserve those stories? This course analyzes what is culturally, ecologically and religiously at stake in the inherited narratives humans have about the land. It does so by investigating stories about nature in creative, philosophical and religious writing. It focuses on the ways human experiences in forests, deserts, snow and water have been used as resources to challenge problems of race, injustice and violence in modern life. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 365 and AUREL 365.
  
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    AUENV 368 - Women and Environmental Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of women's writing about nature and environment focusing on various themes relevant to environmental literature, primarily the various ways that the natural world is represented in literature, and the relationship between cultural constructions of nature and cultural constructions of gender, class, race, and sexuality. Works include fiction, poetry, and/or nonfiction. An introduction to several ecofeminist theorists provides a critical framework for exploring images and themes in women's environmental literature. Prerequisites: Two of AUENG 102, 103 or 104, and *6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 215). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 268, 368, AUENG 268, 368.
  
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    AUENV 375 - Canadian Environmental History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Historical examination of the dynamic interrelationships between the natural world and humans, with a focus on Canadian issues within a North American context. Topics and perspectives will include: Aboriginal peoples, colonization, fur trade, exploration, settlement, western agriculture, science, and the conservation movement. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 375, 475, AUHIS 375, 475.
  
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    AUENV 401 - Directed Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3) Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area in environmental science as defined by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisites: *6 in Environmental Studies. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies/Science. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 401 is classified as a science courses.
  
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    AUENV 402 - Directed Reading


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area in environmental studies as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: *6 in Environmental Studies. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 402 is classified as an arts course.
  
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    AUENV 420 - Parks and Wilderness


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of scientific principles and concepts underlying parks, wilderness, and other protected area systems with emphasis on Canada. Topics include history, philosophy, conceptual frameworks, roles in sustainability, and types of biological and geographical designations. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120; and one of AUBIO 350, 351, 459, AUENV 324, 350, 459, AUGEO 324, 351. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 320, 420, AUGEO 320, 420.
  
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    AUENV 421 - Environmental Science: History and Impacts


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Overview of the historical developments, past and current impacts, and changing roles of the field of environmental science. Prerequisites: One of AUBIO 350, AUENV 320, 324, 350, 420, AUGEO 320, 324, 420 and at least fourth-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 421 and AUGEO 421.
  
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    AUENV 425 - Environmental Impact Assessment


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) History and theory of environmental impact assessment; legislative and policy frameworks; role in resource planning; methods and techniques for the assessment of impacts; future directions. Prerequisites: One of AUENV 324, AUGEO 324, and AUBIO 253. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 425, AUGEO 425. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUENV 434 - Advanced Field Studies in Environmental Science and Ecology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This 3-week, residential field course develops advanced skills for field studies in environmental science and ecology. Through independent research projects, students will design and execute a field-based project, analyze and interpret the data, and present the results in a written and oral format. Students will also gain experience with common field techniques and more advanced statistical analyses. Prerequisites: AUSTA 215 and AUBIO 253; one of AUBIO 315, AUENV 324, AUENV/AUBIO 334, AUBIO 459 or AUENV 459; and consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUENV 459 - Field Studies in Tropical Ecology and Conservation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0 2 weeks field work) Field course that addresses problems of biodiversity and conservation in tropical environments. The student participates in field workshops, and designs and conducts their own field project to answer questions related to ecological and biological conservation. Prerequisite: AUBIO 350 or AUENV 350, and consent of the instructors based on successful completion of the selection process. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 459 and AUENV 459. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUENV 475 - Canadian Environmental History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Historical examination of the dynamic interrelationships between the natural world and humans, with a focus on Canadian issues within a North American context. Topics and perspectives will include: Aboriginal peoples, colonization, fur trade, exploration, settlement, western agriculture, science, and the conservation movement. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 375, 475, AUHIS 375, 475.

Augustana Faculty - Fine Arts: Undergraduate

  
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    AUFAR 100 - Selected Topics in Fine Arts


    ★ 1-6 (variable) (variable, variable) Selected topics in the study of Fine Arts. Content may vary from course to course. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisites: Varies according to topic.
  
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    AUFAR 200 - Selected Topics in Fine Arts


    ★ 1-6 (variable) (variable, variable) Selected topics in the study of Fine Arts. Content may vary from course to course. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisites: Varies according to topic.
  
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    AUFAR 300 - Selected Topics in Fine Arts


    ★ 1-6 (variable) (variable, variable) Selected topics in the study of Fine Arts. Content may vary from course to course. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisites: Varies according to topic.
  
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    AUFAR 400 - Selected Topics in Fine Arts


    ★ 1-6 (variable) (variable, variable) Selected topics in the study of Fine Arts. Content may vary from course to course. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisites: Varies according to topic.

Augustana Faculty - French: Undergraduate

Department of Fine Arts
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUFRE 101 - Beginners' French I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) AUFRE 101 and 102 are designed to develop ability in reading and writing French, with a strong emphasis on the development of comprehension and oral communication skills. During this process the student participates in a wide variety of interactive activities and is also exposed to contemporary francophone culture. These two courses not only encourage the student to think critically about the principles of grammar as they relate to the French language, but also stimulate an in-depth understanding of the principles by which language functions in general. These two courses also lead the student through the steps of reflective learning as they consider and discuss language learning strategies. Notes: The course is not open to a student with credit in French 20, or to a student with French 30 or equivalent. AUFRE 101 does not count toward the major in Modern Languages or the minor in French.
  
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    AUFRE 102 - Beginners' French II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) Continuation of AUFRE 101. Prerequisite: French 20 or AUFRE 101 or consent of the instructor. Notes: The course is not open to a student with French 30 or equivalent. AUFRE 102 does not count toward the major in Modern Languages or the minor in French.
  
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    AUFRE 201 - Intermediate French I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) Intensive training in spoken and written French. The major focus is on communication. Prerequisite: French 30 or AUFRE 102. Notes: A student wishing to register in AUFRE 201 must first take an on-line placement test. The purpose of the test is to advise the student of the appropriate level at which to begin university French.
  
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    AUFRE 202 - Intermediate French II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) Further development of the speaking, reading, and writing skills acquired in AUFRE 201. The major focus is on formal grammar. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 201; French 31a or 31b or 31c, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French Language Arts 20 or 30 (equal to French immersion), with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUFRE 301 - Advanced French I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) As a normal sequel to AUFRE 202, the course develops further the speaking, reading, and writing skills acquired at the Intermediate level. The major focus is on formal grammar. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 202; French 31a or 31b or 31c, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French Language Arts 20 or 30 (equal to French immersion), with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUFRE 305 - Aspects of Civilization and Culture of France I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) French civilization and culture up to the French Revolution as seen from historical, geographical, social, and cultural points of view. The course aims at improving the student's command of oral and written French. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 202; Français 20 or 30, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French 31a or 31b or 31c, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French Language Arts 20 or 30 (equal to French immersion), with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUFRE 337 - Selected Topics in French Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of selected topics in French literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year.
  
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    AUFRE 339 - Selected Topics in French Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of selected topics in French literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year.
  
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    AUFRE 402 - Directed Study: Language


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Intensive study of the French language. Prerequisite: AUFRE 301 or consent of the instructor. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUFRE 403 - Directed Reading


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of French literature and/or civilization as defined by the student and the instructor. Prerequisite: AUFRE 301. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

Augustana Faculty - Geography: Undergraduate

Department of Science
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUGEO 218 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Introduction to fundamentals and applications of Geographic Information Systems. Topics include the nature of geographic data, geo-referencing systems, geographic modelling, data collection and management, and spatial analysis. Practical applications of GIS will be emphasized with the use of appropriate computer software. Prerequisite: Any 100-level science course.
  
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    AUGEO 230 - Geomorphology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Analysis of (1) geomorphological processes and agents (such as movement of the earth's crust, volcanism, water, glaciers, waves, currents, wind, and gravity) that create and modify the earth's surface and (2) landforms. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUGEO 231 - Climatology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Study of (1) elements and processes of climate and weather; (2) distributions and regional patterns of climates; and (3) interrelationships among climates, plants, animals, and people. Note: AUGEO 230 need not precede AUGEO 231. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUGEO 242 - Cultural Geography of Scandinavia


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of Scandinavian life and achievement, past and present, with emphasis on social and cultural conditions against a geographical and historical background. All lectures and readings are in English. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 242 and AUSCA 231.
  
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    AUGEO 301 - Directed Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3) Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of geography as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: *6 in Geography. Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Geography. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGEO 301 is classified as a science course.
  
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    AUGEO 302 - Directed Reading


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of geography as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: *6 in Geography. Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Geography. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGEO 302 is classified as an arts course.
  
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    AUGEO 341 - Geography of the Canadian North


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the biophysical environments, resources, economics, and settlements of northern regions of Canada. Prerequisites: One of AUPED 184, 283, 284, 286; *3 in Geography and consent of the instructor. Notes: This course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUGEO 343 or AUPED 388. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 341 and AUPED 387. AUGEO 341 is classified as an arts course.
  
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    AUGEO 343 - Expedition in the Canadian North


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable) Examination, involving a three- to four-week expedition in the summer, of the biophysical environments, resources, economics, and settlements of northern regions of Canada. Prerequisites: AUGEO 341 or AUPED 387, and consent of the instructor(s). Notes: Expedition costs, as well as course tuition, are the student's responsibility. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 343 and AUPED 388. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUGEO 351 - Biogeography


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Analysis of the spatial patterns of biotic systems and species. The course examines their past and present distribution patterns in the context of biological and ecological processes and human impacts. The course employs several methods of analysis, including geographic information systems. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 351 and AUBIO 351. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUGEO 401 - Directed Studies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3) Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of geography as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: *6 in science Geography. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Geography. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGEO 401 is classified as a science course.
  
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    AUGEO 402 - Directed Reading


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of geography as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: *6 in Geography. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Geography. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGEO 402 is classified as an arts course.

Augustana Faculty - German: Undergraduate

Department of Fine Arts
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUGER 101 - Beginners' German I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) German 101 and 102 are designed to develop ability in reading and writing German, with a strong emphasis on the development of comprehension and oral communication skills. During this process, the student participates in a wide variety of interactive activities and is also exposed to contemporary culture of German-speaking countries. These two courses not only encourage the student to think critically about the principles of grammar as they relate to the German language, but also stimulate an in-depth understanding of the principles by which language functions in general. These two courses also lead the student through the steps of reflective learning as they consider and discuss language learning strategies. Notes: The course is not open to a student with credit in German 30. AUGER 101 does not count toward the major in Modern Languages or the minor in German.
  
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    AUGER 102 - Beginners' German II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) Continuation of AUGER 101. Prerequisite: AUGER 101. Notes: The course is not open to a student with credit in German 30. AUGER 102 does not count toward the major in Modern Languages or the minor in German.
  
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    AUGER 200 - Intermediate German I and II


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, variable) Intensive course designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing, reading skills acquired in Beginners' German through classroom instruction, excursions, and immersion experience, including living in a German home. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of the culture of the German-speaking countries and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: One of AUGER 102, demonstration of AUGER 102 equivalency by means of a placement exam administered by the instructor, one year Beginners' German at a Canadian university. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 200, 201, 202. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUGER 201 - Intermediate German I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) Designed to develop fluency in speaking, with emphasis on comprehension and writing skills. The essential rules of grammar are studied. Prerequisite: One of AUGER 102, demonstration of AUGER 102 equivalency by means of a placement examination administered by the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 200, 201.
  
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    AUGER 202 - Intermediate German II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) Continuation of AUGER 201. Prerequisite: AUGER 201. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 202, 200.
  
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    AUGER 291 - German Drama in Translation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Analysis of German drama in English translation from the eighteenth century to the present.
  
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    AUGER 300 - Advanced German I and II


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, variable) Intensive course designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing, reading skills acquired in Intermediate German through classroom instruction, excursions, and immersion experience, including living in a German home. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of the culture of the German-speaking countries and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: AUGER 200 or 202; or two years of German study at a Canadian university, including one year Beginners' level and one year Intermediate level. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 300, 301 and 302. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUGER 301 - Advanced German I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) Thorough review of German grammar and study of refined stylistics and idioms as represented in selections of twentieth-century short stories. Colloquial expressions presently in use are studied through discussion and audiovisual presentation. Prerequisite: AUGER 200 or 202. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 301, 300.
  
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    AUGER 302 - Advanced German II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0) Continuation of AUGER 301. Prerequisite: AUGER 301. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 302, 300.
  
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    AUGER 335 - Selected Topics in German Language


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of selected topics in German language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year.
  
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    AUGER 337 - Selected Topics in German Literature


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of selected topics in German literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year.
  
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    AUGER 400 - Advanced German III and IV


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, variable) Intensive course designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing, reading skills acquired in Advanced German through classroom instruction, excursions, and immersion experience, including living in a German home. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of the culture of the German-speaking countries and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: AUGER 300 or 302; or three years of German study at a Canadian university, including one year Beginners' level, one year Intermediate level and one year Advanced level. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUGER 402 - Directed Study: Translation Techniques


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0) Intensive study in translation techniques (German-English, English-German). Specific literature (e.g., reports, sermons, essays, philosophical or business writings) is chosen by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGER 302 and consent of the instructor. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUGER 403 - Directed Reading


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of German as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUGER 415 - German Immersion Community Service-Learning


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable) Students provide 50 hours of community service to participants in the Canadian Summer School in Germany program in the form of supervised classroom support and peer consultation. They also critically reflect on curriculum as planned, taught, and interpreted and language teacher-student professional interpersonal relations. Prerequisite: Having participated in the Canadian Summer School in Germany and having completed AUGER 200, 300, or 400 and consent of the instructor. Note: Students enrolling in this course must be able to demonstrate a high level of German language proficiency.
  
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    AUGER 425 - German Language Teaching and Learning


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, variable) Intensive blended course designed to improve students' understanding and application of second language acquisition theories and pedagogical content knowledge through online and classroom instruction as well as an immersion experience. This course will examine approaches such as content and language integrated learning, drama pedagogy, intercultural ethnography, and task-based language teaching in an immersion setting. Students will also enhance their own German language skills, specifically as relating to everyday interaction, classroom language, and language awareness. Further development of knowledge about German culture, society, and/or history for the purpose of instruction in Canada is also integral to this course. The course materials, instruction and assignments will be in English and German; the immersion component will be entirely in German. Prerequisite: a working knowledge of German and consent of Department. Note: Students enrolling in this course must be able to demonstrate a high level of German language proficiency. This course is intended for pre-service teachers. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUGER 525 - German Language Teaching and Learning


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, variable) Intensive blended course designed to improve students' understanding and application of second language acquisition theories and pedagogical content knowledge through online and classroom instruction as well as an immersion experience. This course will examine approaches such as content and language integrated learning, drama pedagogy, intercultural ethnography, and task-based language teaching in an immersion setting. Students will also enhance their own German language skills, specifically as relating to everyday interaction, classroom language, and language awareness. Further development of knowledge about German culture, society, and/or history for the purpose of instruction in Canada is also integral to this course. The course materials, instruction and assignments will be in English and German; the immersion component will be entirely in German. Prerequisite: a working knowledge of German and consent of Department. Note: Students enrolling in this course must be able to demonstrate a high level of German language proficiency. This course is intended primarily for in-service teachers. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

Augustana Faculty - Global and Development Studies: Undergraduate

Department of Social Sciences
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUGDS 223 - Development Studies Practicum


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6) By working in an African, Asian, or Latin American country in projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid,sustainable farming, developing cooperatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 223, 323, AUSPA 241, 341.
  
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    AUGDS 323 - Development Studies Practicum


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6) By working in an African, Asian, or Latin American country in projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing co-operatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 223, 323, AUSPA 241, 341.
  
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    AUGDS 400 - Capstone Research Seminar


    ★ 6 (fi 12) (variable, 3-0-0) Preparation of a literature review, and research proposal, and presentation. Research may be participatory, qualitative, archival, community based, and may include a practical component. Classes will provide supportive and critical analysis throughout students research process and examine issues, theories, and practices central to global and development studies and social change. This course integrates the varied disciplinary approaches and practices experienced throughout the program. Prerequisites: Third or fourth year standing. Only open to majors in IDS-Global and Development Studies. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 400 and AUPOL 400.

Augustana Faculty - History: Undergraduate

Department of Social Sciences
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUHIS 104 - World History: The West


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Introduction to understanding our world: aspects of European, North American, and Islamic history.
  
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    AUHIS 105 - World History: The East and the South


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Introduction to understanding our world: aspects of Asian, African, and Latin American history.
  
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    AUHIS 121 - Topics in Global History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Selected topic in global history. Topics vary from year to year depending on instructor and student interest.
  
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    AUHIS 190 - The Historian's Craft: Research Skills and Tools


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Introduction to the skills and methods needed for the study of history. The course familiarizes students with the specialized vocabulary of the discipline. It guides students through all the steps necessary to write a research paper: the choice and delineation of a research topic, the elaboration of the thesis, the collection of data and the treatment of the information, the outline and the writing of the paper. Note: This course is only open to students with a major or a minor in History.
  
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    AUHIS 201 - European History I: Fall of the Roman Empire to the French Revolution


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Major themes in the development of European society from the fall of the Roman Empire in the West to the eve of the French Revolution.
  
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    AUHIS 202 - European History II: French Revolution to the Present


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of the social, political, and military history of Europe from the French Revolution to the present. Topics include the causes and results of revolutions, strategy and diplomacy of the two World Wars, and the emergence of a new postwar Europe.
  
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    AUHIS 207 - History of the Roman Republic


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) History of the Roman Republic from its beginnings to the Battle of Actium in 31 B.C. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 207 and AUCLA 223.
  
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    AUHIS 208 - History of the Roman Empire


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) History of the Roman Empire from the time of Augustus to the fall of the West in the fifth century A.D. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 208 and AUCLA 224.
  
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    AUHIS 212 - Sport, Physical Activity, and the Body: Historical Perspectives


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of major themes in the history of sport, physical activity, and the body. Beginning with the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome, the course explores the social, cultural, political, philosophical, religious, and economic factors that have influenced sport, physical education, and attitudes toward the body in various time periods. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 212 and AUPED 262.
  
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    AUHIS 243 - British History since 1688


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Introduction to the salient features of British history from 1688 to the present.
  
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    AUHIS 250 - United States History to 1865


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of the social, political, and military history of the United States from Colonial times to the Civil War. Topics include European settlement, the War of Independence, making a new country, westward expansion, slavery, and the disruption of the Union.
  
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    AUHIS 251 - United States History since 1865


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of the social, political, and military history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Topics include Reconstruction, industrial and economic development, Indian wars, the Great Depression, World Wars and the Cold War, and early twenty-first century American exceptionalism.
  
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    AUHIS 260 - An Introduction to the Study of Canadian History to 1867


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Canada's political, social and economic development from life before European Contact to Confederation. Lectures, assigned readings, films and discussions will provide factual background on Canadian history and stimulate critical thinking.
  
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    AUHIS 261 - An Introduction to the Study of Canadian History, 1867 to the Present


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Political, social, economic and cultural questions of Canada since 1867. Taking a thematic approach, lectures, assigned readings, films and discussions will provide factual background on Canadian history and stimulate critical thinking.
  
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    AUHIS 262 - History of Canadian Economic Development


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of Canada's economic development from before Confederation until the present. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 262 and AUECO 251.
  
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    AUHIS 271 - The History of Women in Canadian Society


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) History of Canadian women from the seventeenth century to the present, looking at how Canadian women were affected by, and how they contributed to, changes in Canadian society.
  
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    AUHIS 300 - Topics in European History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Advanced study of selected periods and themes in European history. Focus and content of each course vary from year to year. Topics are announced before registration.
  
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    AUHIS 312 - The Modern Olympic Games


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the historical development of the modern Olympic Games. Topics include politics, nationalism, culture, commercialism, media, gender, race and identity. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 312 and AUPED 369.
  
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    AUHIS 316 - Europe in the Eighteenth Century


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Royal absolutism from Russia to France, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. Prerequisite: None, but AUHIS 201 and 202 would be useful.
  
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    AUHIS 322 - Nineteenth-Century Europe to 1849


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Restoration, liberalism, nationalism, and revolution. Prerequisite: None, but AUHIS 202 would be useful.
  
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    AUHIS 323 - Nineteenth-Century Europe since 1849


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Industrialization and modernization of continental Europe; origins of World War I. Prerequisite: None, but AUHIS 202 would be useful.
  
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    AUHIS 328 - Germany since Frederick the Great


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of modern German history from Frederick the Great (1740) to the defeat of Hitler in 1945.
  
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    AUHIS 329 - Topics in the History and Culture of Southern France


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Aspects of the social, political and religious history, as well as the arts, architecture and literature of Southern France. All lectures and readings are in English.
  
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    AUHIS 337 - History of the Soviet Union, 1917 to 1941


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Historical survey of Soviet domestic and foreign policy from 1917 to 1941.
  
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    AUHIS 338 - History of the Soviet Union, 1941 to 1991


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Historical survey of Soviet domestic and foreign policy from 1941 to 1991.
  
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    AUHIS 356 - History of the United States West


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of the western United States from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. Special emphasis is given to the west's integration into the industrial and urban life of the nation. Prerequisite: AUHIS 251 or consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUHIS 360 - Selected Topics in Canadian History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (variable, 3-0-0) Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity.
  
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    AUHIS 361 - Selected Topics in Canadian History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity.
  
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    AUHIS 368 - History of Sport in Canada


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the history of sport in Canadian society, from colonial times to the present. The course links developments in sport to wider changes in Canadian society and social relations. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 368 and AUPED 368.
  
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    AUHIS 369 - History of Canada's Aboriginal Peoples


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Examination of the history of Aboriginal Canada from the beginning of human occupation of what is now Canada to the present. Special attention is paid to the period after European contact, and to the relationship between Native peoples and the French, British, and Canadian governments.
  
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    AUHIS 372 - History of Quebec


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) A general history of Quebec from the French Regime to the present-day. Lectures and tutorials will place particular emphasis on the development of French Canadian nationalism, and the relationship between Quebec and Canada.
  
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    AUHIS 375 - Canadian Environmental History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Historical examination of the dynamic interrelationships between the natural world and humans, with a focus on Canadian issues within a North American context. Topics and perspectives will include: Aboriginal peoples, colonization, fur trade, exploration, settlement, western agriculture, science, and the conservation movement. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 375, 475, AUENV 375, 475.
  
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    AUHIS 400 - Topics in European History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Advanced study of selected periods and themes in European history. Focus and content of each course vary from year to year. Topics are announced before registration.
  
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    AUHIS 401 - Directed Reading I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (variable, 1-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of history as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing and consent of the instructor. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUHIS 402 - Directed Reading II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Intensive study of a specific area of history as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUHIS 401 and consent of the instructor. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUHIS 454 - The United States Civil War Era, 1846 to 1877


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Political, military, and socio-economic history of the United States Civil War: its causes, prosecution, and aftermath. Prerequisite: AUHIS 250.
  
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    AUHIS 460 - Selected Topics in Canadian History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (variable, 3-0-0) Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity.
  
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    AUHIS 461 - Selected Topics in Canadian History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity.
 

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