May 08, 2021  
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 
    
University of Alberta Calendar 2020-2021 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Listings


 

Details of Courses

Courses taught at the University of Alberta are listed alphabetically. All courses, except those taught by Faculté Saint-Jean, are described in English.

Each course is designated by its computer abbreviation and a number. Students should use this abbreviation and number when completing any form requiring this information.

Courses are numbered according to the following system:

000-099 Pre-University
100-199 Basic Undergraduate. Normally requires no university-level prerequisites. Designed typically for students in the first year of a program.
200-299 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 100-level. Designed typically for students in the second year of a program.
300-399 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 200-level. Designed typically for students in the third year of a program.
400-499 Advanced Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 300-level. Designed typically for students in the fourth year of a program.
500-599 Graduate. Designated for graduate students and certain advanced or honors undergraduate students in their final year.
600-799 Graduate Courses
800-899 Special Registrations
900-999 Graduate Thesis and Project Numbers

For the purposes of program descriptions and prerequisite designation, courses numbered 100-199 are designated as Junior Courses and courses numbered 200-499 are designated as Senior Courses.

Note: Some exceptions to the course number system described above have been granted to the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.

Course Description Symbols and Figures

Several symbols and figures are used to indicate the type, duration, and weight of courses.

  1. ★—Indicates “units of course weight,” and usually follows the course title. The accompanying number indicates the weight of the course as used in computing grade point averages and for meeting degree requirements.
    A course which runs throughout the Fall/Winter (i.e., from September through April) is usually weighted ★6. A course that runs for only one term (i.e., Fall: from September to December, or Winter: from January through April) is usually weighted ★3. Certain courses are offered over Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer, or in one term, with weights of ★1, ★2, and ★4. These are considered as one-sixth, one-third, and two-thirds of a Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer course, respectively. Some honors and graduate courses involving research may vary in weight according to the length and difficulty of the project. Some clinical courses may vary in weight according to the length of clinical experience. Some courses, not included in the computation of grade point averages, are offered for credit only and either carry a weight of ★0, or are marked as “Credit.”
    Undergraduate students who take courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering but are not registered in Engineering will have a course weight assigned for these courses according to the protocol of their home Faculty.
  2. fi—Denotes: “fee index,” the value used to calculate the instructional fees for each course. The fee index is multiplied by the fee index value (given in the appropriate subsection of Fees Payment Guide ) to give the dollar value of instructional fees for the course.
    For normal courses, the fee index is twice the value of the units of course weight; for example, a course with ★3 normally has fi 6. In cases where exceptional fees considerations need to be made, the fee index is set differently by the Board of Governors.
    Note that certain programs (e.g., MD, DDS, etc.) are assessed on a program fee basis for all or certain years. In these cases, the fee index calculation does not apply.
  3. (x term, a-b-c)—These figures in parentheses give information on when the course is offered and the hours of instruction required by the course in a week, or in some cases the total time in a term.
    In the case of a single-term course, the term in which the course is given is mentioned (item x). The designation “either term” means that the course may be offered either in the first term or in the second term or in each term, at the discretion of the department concerned. The designation “variable” means that the course may be taught either as a single-term or as a full-session course.
    Item a indicates lecture hours. Item b indicates seminar hour(s), demonstration hours (d), clinic hours (c), or lecture-laboratory hours (L). Item c indicates laboratory hours. For two-term courses, the hours of instruction are the same in both terms unless otherwise indicated. The expression 3/2 means 3 hours of instruction every second week; 2s/2 means 2 seminar hours every second week.
    Examples:
    (first term, 3-0-3): a course taught in first term with 3 hours lecture, no seminar, and 3 hours lab per week.
    (second term, 0-1s-2): a course taught in second term with no lectures, 1 seminar hour, and 2 hours of lab per week.
    (either term, 3-0-0): a course taught in either first or second term, or each term, with 3 lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
    (two-term, 3-0-3): a course taught over both first and second term with three lecture hours, no seminar, and three hours lab per week.
    (variable, 3-0-0): a course which may be taught in either first or second term or over two terms with three lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab.
  4. Prerequisite—This provides information on courses which must be successfully completed before registering in the more advanced course.
    Corequisite—This provides information on courses which must be taken before or at the same time as the course described in the listing.
    Note: Departments are authorized to cancel the registration of those students registered in a course offered by the department if they do not meet the prerequisite and/or corequisite requirements stated in the course description in this Calendar.
  5. [Department]— This indicates the department responsible for registration for interdepartmental courses. Normally, courses will be credited to the discipline listed in the square brackets.
  6. Open Studies Courses—Courses that are available to Open Studies students are designated in Bear Tracks Course Catalog by the  symbol.  indicates that a course is available to Open Studies students on a delayed registration basis only (see Registration  for complete details).  To browse courses that have been approved for Open Studies students, see Open Studies Course Listings on the Office of the Registrar website.
Important: Registration Procedures for Two-Term Courses

Students are strongly advised to refer to the Registration and Courses menu at www.registrarsoffice.ualberta.ca for details. Two-term courses are normally offered over two terms (either Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer). In a few instances, two-term courses are offered within a single term. In all cases these are identifiable in the Class Schedule because they consist of part A and part B (e.g., English 111A and 111B).

To successfully register in a two-term course, students, must do the following:

  • Register in both the part A and part B for all types of sections offered (Lectures, Labs, Seminars, etc.);
  • Register in the same section numbers for part A and part B of a course (e.g., Lecture A1 for both part A and part B, and Lab E3 for both part A and part B);
  • Register in all the appropriate sections on the same day.

All of the above must be done or the course registration is invalid and will be deleted. Invalid registrations will be deleted nightly. It is the student’s responsibility to attempt the course registration again, subject to availability.

Example: A student wishes to register in ABCD 101, a two-term course. It has a lecture and a lab section. Based on the student’s timetable planning, decides to take Lecture C3 and Lab C8. The student must add

In Fall Term ABCD 101A Lec C3 and ABCD 101A Lab C8,
and  
In Winter Term ABCD 101B Lec C3 and ABCD 101B Lab C8.

All these sections must be added on the same day to successfully register. Otherwise the registration in ABCD 101 will be deleted overnight and the student’s place in the course will be lost.

Course Renumbering

Over the years many courses have been renumbered. Old numbers can be found within individual course listings of previous Calendar editions.

Courses on Reserve

Courses not offered in the past four years are removed from this Calendar and placed on Reserve. These courses may be taught again in the future, in which case they would be brought back into the active Course Listings and placed in the Calendar. Information about Reserve Courses is available through the Registrar’s Office, the University Secretariat, and Faculty Offices.

Faculty Specific Regulations Regarding Courses

For specific Faculty regulations relating to courses and for a complete list of subjects taught by a Faculty, please consult the Undergraduate Programs section of the Calendar at the end of each Faculty section.

Physical Requirements for University Courses

The University has a commitment to the education of all academically qualified students and special services are frequently provided on campus to assist disabled students.

Nevertheless, some courses make certain unavoidable demands on students with respect to the possession of a certain level of physical skill or ability if the academic objectives of the course are to be realized. In case of doubt, students are advised to contact the Department concerned and Student Accessibility Disability Services (SAS), Office of the Dean of Students.

Because support services cannot be guaranteed for all off-campus courses, instructors may be obliged to refuse registration in such courses.

Course Availability

The following is a comprehensive course listing of all the approved courses that the University of Alberta may offer. The appearance of a course in this list does not guarantee that the course will actually be offered. The most current information on courses is available on Bear Tracks at https://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca

Course Listings

 

Art dramatique: Cours de 1er cycle

Faculté Saint-Jean

  
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    ADRAM 486 - Création littéraire


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, variable) Atelier de création littéraire mettant l'accent sur l'exploration des langages narratifs, poétiques et dramatiques, ainsi que l'écriture de l'intime (autofiction). Le processus de création sera soumis au regard critique des pairs en plus de la lecture et l'analyse de différents genres littéraires. Préalable(s) : *3 de littérature niveau 200 ou *3 ADRAM niveau 200. Note: ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ADRAM 484 ou LITT 486.

Arts: Cours de 1er cycle

Faculté Saint-Jean

  
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    ARTE 101 - Initiation à la recherche et à l'écriture universitaire


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, variable) Initiation à la rédaction scientifique dans les domaines des sciences humaines et sociales. Formation au respect des règles de déontologie de l'écriture scientifique (citation et constitution de la bibliographie) et en matière de rédaction d'un travail de recherche (structuration, constitution du plan, articulations). Note : Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits WRS 101.
  
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    ARTE 125 - Raisonnement et pensée critique


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, variable) Acquisition de compétences fondamentales en raisonnement et analyse critique des argumentations par l'étude des types d'argumentation, des structures logiques, des critères employés dans l'évaluation des arguments et des sophismes. La matière du cours inclura une initiation à la méthode philosophique, à la recherche documentaire et à la rédaction d'un travail scientifique. Note : Ce cours n'est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour PHILE 125.
  
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    ARTE 399 - Choix de sujet


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, variable) Étude d'un sujet au choix en Arts. Le contenu varie d'une année à l'autre selon les intérêts de l'étudiant et du professeur. Préalable : l'approbation du professeur. Note : Ce cours est destiné en particulier aux étudiants de la mineure individualisée.
  
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    ARTE 450 - Rédaction de mémoire I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, variable) Étude avancée d'un sujet au choix en Arts. Le contenu varie d'une année à l'autre selon les intérêts de l'étudiant et du professeur. Préalable : l'approbation du professeur. Note : cours réservé aux étudiants du BA avec spécialisation (BAs) pour la rédaction de leur mémoire.
  
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    ARTE 490 - Rédaction de mémoire II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, variable) Étude avancée d'un sujet au choix en Arts. Le contenu varie d'une année à l'autre selon les intérêts de l'étudiant et du professeur. Préalable : l'approbation du professeur. Note : cours réservé aux étudiants du BA avec spécialisation (BAs) pour la rédaction de leur mémoire.
  
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    ARTE 499 - Choix de sujet ou stage


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (l'un ou l'autre semestre, variable) Étude d'un sujet au choix en Arts ou stage de recherche. Le contenu varie d'une année à l'autre selon les intérêts de l'étudiant et du professeur. Préalable : l'approbation du professeur. Note : Ce cours est destiné en particulier aux étudiants de la mineure individualisée.

Astronomy: Undergraduate

Department of Physics
Faculty of Science

  
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    ASTRO 101 - Black Holes


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) An introduction to the science of black holes and its connection to how black holes are portrayed in popular culture and news. Topics include: properties of light; introduction to gravity, relativity and quantum physics; life cycle of stars; measurements of black hole properties; observed features of black holes interacting with their environment; event horizons, the ergosphere, and singularities; quantum black holes, information, and Hawking radiation; gravitational lensing; gravitational radiation. Prerequisites: Math 30-1. Credit may be obtained for only one of ASTRO 101 or ASTRO 122.
  
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    ASTRO 120 - Astronomy of the Solar System


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The development of astronomy and astronomical techniques, including results obtained from the latest orbiting observatories. The origin, evolution and nature of the Earth, the other planets and non-planetary bodies will be discussed. Viewing experience will be available using the campus observatory. Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1 and Physics 30.
  
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    ASTRO 122 - Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The development of our understanding of the universe, including current models of stellar evolution and cosmology. Emphasis on understanding the physical processes underlying astronomical phenomena. Viewing experience will be available using the campus observatory. Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1 and Physics 30.
  
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    ASTRO 320 - Stellar Astrophysics I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Application of physics to stellar formation and stellar evolution; theoretical models and observational comparisons of main sequence stars, white dwarf stars, neutron stars, supernovae, black holes; binary star systems, stellar atmospheres and stellar spectra. Prerequisites: MATH 115, 118, or 146, and one of PHYS 124, PHYS 144, or EN PH 131, and one of PHYS 126, PHYS 146, or PHYS 130. Pre or corequisite: any 200-level PHYS course. Some additional knowledge of astronomy (ASTRO 120 and/or 122) is advantageous.
  
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    ASTRO 322 - Galactic and Extragalactic Astrophysics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The interstellar medium and interstellar reddening; galactic structure; kinematics and dynamics of stars in galaxies; quasars; introduction of cosmology. Prerequisites: MATH 115, 118, or 146, and one of PHYS 124, PHYS 144, or EN PH 131, and one of PHYS 126, PHYS 146, or PHYS 130, and PHYS 208 or 271. Previous knowledge of astronomy is advantageous. ASTRO 320 is strongly recommended.
  
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    ASTRO 429 - Upper Atmosphere and Space Physics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Basic space plasma phenomena: the Earth's plasma and field environment; the solar cycle; generation of the solar wind; the interplanetary plasma and field environment; the solar-terrestrial interaction; magnetospheric substorms; the aurora borealis; magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; effects of magnetospheric storms on man-made systems; use of natural electromagnetic fields for geophysical exploration. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 381.
  
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    ASTRO 430 - Physical Cosmology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Observational cosmology; geometry and matter content of the Universe; physical processes in the early stages of the Universe; inflation, Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the cosmic microwave background radiation; cosmological aspects of galaxy formation and the growth of large-scale structure. Prerequisites: PHYS 310, MATH 334. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 458.
  
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    ASTRO 465 - Stellar Astrophysics II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Stellar interiors and nuclear transformations; energy transport; model stars; variable stars; stellar evolution. Prerequisites: PHYS 310, 271, ASTRO 320, MATH 334. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of ASTRO 465 or ASTRO 565.

Astronomy: Graduate

Note: The following undergraduate courses may be taken for credit by graduate students: ASTRO 429 , ASTRO 430 , ASTRO 465 ; PHYS 415 , PHYS 420 , PHYS 472 , PHYS 481 , PHYS 485 , PHYS 499 .

  
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    ASTRO 565 - Stellar Astrophysics II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Stellar interiors and nuclear transformations; energy transport; model stars; variable stars; stellar evolution. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of ASTRO 465 or ASTRO 565.

Augustana Faculty - Accounting: Undergraduate

Department of Social Sciences
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUACC 311 - Introductory Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5) Postulates, principles, the accounting cycle, capital and income measurement, financial statement preparation and analysis; emphasis on reporting to shareholders, creditors, and other external decision makers. Prerequisites: AUECO 101, 102, and basic familiarity with microcomputer applications.
  
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    AUACC 322 - Managerial Accounting


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Designed to help managers assess needed information to carry out three essential functions in an organization: planning operations, controlling activities, and making decisions. The emphasis of this course is on cost behaviors, various product costing methods, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting and control through standard costs, and other quantitative techniques used by management. Prerequisite: AUACC 311.

Augustana Faculty - Art: Undergraduate

Department of Fine Arts
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUART 100 - Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course introduces students to the study of art and visual culture. Students will learn how to analyze images and works of art while engaging with select examples of both historical and contemporary art and visual culture.
  
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    AUART 111 - Studio Foundation I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Art-making is explored with basic techniques in drawing and color media. The visual language of perception and expression is introduced using principles of composition. Aesthetic and psychological principles of visual organization are applied to elements of line, shape, colour, and texture.
  
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    AUART 112 - Studio Foundation II - 3-D and Colour Theory


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Further exploration of art-making in two and three dimensions. Visual structure is investigated expressively and technically in sculpture processes and paint media. Development of personal creativity and a basis for compositional analysis are included. Prerequisite: AUART 111, or Art 30 equivalence with consent of the instructor (based on portfolio submission).
  
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    AUART 215 - Sculpture I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Introduction to principles of composition and practice in 3-dimensional art. Historical and contemporary issues are explored. Prerequisite: Second year standing. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUART 220 - Modern Life, Modern Art


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) This course examines the development of modern art (c. 1848-1960) as a response to the new conditions and experiences of urban industrial society. We will ask what makes a work of art "modern" and question the utility of such works of art for the modern age.
  
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    AUART 223 - Canadian Art


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of the visual arts in Canada, from the indigenous beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the twentieth century.
  
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    AUART 224 - Art and Its Histories


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of works, movements, theories and institutions of art with an emphasis on contemporary art and recent approaches to the study and analysis of art works. It examines painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, graphic and applied art.
  
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    AUART 225 - Photography: History and Theory


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) This course examines the history and theory of photography from its origins in the late 18th-century to the present. We will consider photographs and photographic practices from a number of different perspectives, with an emphasis on the following topics: the nature of photography, personal photography, art photography and documentary photography.
  
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    AUART 231 - Drawing I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Introductory course that develops basic skills of perception and recording as they apply to the practice of drawing. Historical and contemporary practices are explored primarily on the basis of direct observation of still life, landscape, and architecture. Issues in composition, expression, critical analysis, and technique using monochromatic media are included. Prerequisite: Second year standing, or Art 30, or consent of the instructor (based on portfolio submission). Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUART 232 - Drawing II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Further exploration of drawing practice with the application of observational and conceptual skills to issues of expression and composition. Figure drawing, including anatomy, perceptual considerations, and the expressive potential of the human figure, is introduced. The use of colour media, the development of a personal aesthetic response, as well as critical analysis are included. Prerequisite: Second year standing. Note: AUART 111 or AUART 231 are recommended prior to enrolling. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUART 260 - Selected Topics in Art History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Selected topics in Art History possibly, but not necessarily, linked to a course that would later visit sites of art and visual culture.
  
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    AUART 261 - Selected Topics in Art History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Selected topics in Art History possibly, but not necessarily, linked to a course that would later visit sites of art and visual culture.
  
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    AUART 262 - Selected Topics in Art History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Selected topics in Art History possibly, but not necessarily, linked to a course that would later visit sites of art and visual culture.
  
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    AUART 265 - Selected Topics in Art History Tour


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable in 3 weeks) Tour course following the selected topics course to which it is linked. The tour visits art sites discussed in that course. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUART 271 - Painting I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Painting from the ground up. The course introduces painting technique and colour usage in acrylic and/or oil media. Perceptual and conceptual problems are based on historical and contemporary practices with an emphasis on personal creativity. Critical analysis of art is a component. Prerequisites: Second year standing. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUART 272 - Painting II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Further exploration of painting practice using oil and acrylic painting techniques. Critical analysis is included. Varieties of conceptual contexts and individual expressive directions are investigated. Prerequisite: AUART 271 or consent of the instructor (based on portfolio submission). Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUART 281 - Sex, Gender and Art


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Why should we care about gender and sexuality when we look at art and other visual images? In this course, students will answer this question by studying feminist art history, as well as scholarship addressing LGBTQI identities and intersections between gender, sexuality and race.
  
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    AUART 289 - Studies in Visual Culture


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Selected topics in the history of visual culture that are organized thematically rather than by period, nationality or style. Prerequisite: Second-year standing.
  
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    AUART 298 - Selected Topics in Art Studio


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Selected topics in art studio practice that are theme or media based. Prerequisite: Second year standing. Notes: AUART 298 does not count towards any major or minor in Art.
  
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    AUART 331 - Drawing III


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Intermediate drawing further develops techniques and concepts of drawing with a focus on contemporary practices leading to self-initiated projects. Prerequisite: AUART 231. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUART 371 - Painting III


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0) Intermediate painting further develops techniques and concepts of painting with a focus on contemporary practices leading to self-initiated projects. Prerequisite: AUART 272. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUART 380 - Directed Reading in Art History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Individual study project for the advanced art history student. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUART 381 - Selected Topics in Art History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Selected topics in art history and visual culture. Prerequisite: Any 200-level Art history course or consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUART 382 - Selected Topics in Art History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Selected topics in art history and visual culture. Prerequisite: Any 200-level Art history course or consent of the instructor.
  
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    AUART 411 - Visual Explorations


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6s-0) Advanced studies in a studio discipline with individualized programs designed in collaboration with the instructor. Direction is guided by issues in contemporary practice and thought. Prerequisites: AUART 331 and one of 215, 371.
  
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    AUART 421 - Art History Stream Capstone


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) This course will focus on selected themes in art history and visual studies. Emphasis is on the production of either a text-based project, or a combination of a text-based and practice-based project into a single body of work. Prerequisites: AUART 224 and *6 in senior Art History with at least *3 at the 300-level.
  
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    AUART 480 - Directed Reading in Art History


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Individual study project for the highly advanced art history student. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUART 490 - Directed Project in Visual Explorations


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1L-0) Individual study course for the highly advanced studio art student. A selected theme in two- or three-dimensional expression is explored intensively. Note: An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

Augustana Faculty - Biology: Undergraduate

Department of Science
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUBIO 108 - Introduction to Marine Biology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2) Introduction to the diversity of marine ecosystems and the adaptations of marine organisms to their environment. Notes: The course does not count toward the major, concentration, or minor in Biology. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program.
  
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    AUBIO 111 - Integrative Biology I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2) An introduction to functional and developmental biology from molecules to systems, focusing on how organisms integrate different levels of organization in order to live and reproduce. This course covers key topics of biochemistry (metabolism, respiration, photosynthesis), molecular biology (replication, transcription, translation), cell biology (organelles, membranes, cell cycle), physiology (gas exchange, circulation, locomotion) and development (fertilisation, gastrulation, differentiation). Prerequisites: Biology 30 and Chemistry 30.
  
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    AUBIO 112 - Integrative Biology II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2) An introduction to the biology of organisms, focusing on the evolution of biological diversity, including the mechanisms responsible for evolutionary change and the adaptations associated with the evolution of the major groups of organisms. Prerequisites: AUBIO 111.
  
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    AUBIO 219 - Research Experience in Biology


    ★ 1.5 (fi 3) (variable, 0-0-3) Research experience in a faculty research project. Normally taken in addition to a full course load after the successful completion of at least *24 but not more than *60 in a program in the Augustana Faculty. Prerequisites: AUBIO 111 and 112 and consent of the Department. Notes: This course is offered on a pass/fail (credit/no-credit) basis. An "Application for Individual Study", normally requiring a minimum GPA of 2.5 in Biology, must be completed and approved before registration in the course. Credit may be obtained twice.
  
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    AUBIO 230 - Molecular Cell Biology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0) The composition, structure and function of cell membranes including membrane transport, cell signalling and cell-cell interactions. Protein sorting and cytoskeletal function is integrated with their membrane interactions. The social context of cells is also considered. Prerequisite: AUBIO 111. Corequisites: AUBIO 260; AUCHE 250.
  
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    AUBIO 253 - Ecological Interactions


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2) An exploration of basic concepts and methods in ecology and of the relevance of ecological thinking in the life sciences. Emphasis is on interactions at the level of the organism, including physiological and evolutionary perspectives, and on their consequences on the composition and diversity of populations and communities within ecosystems. Prerequisite: AUBIO 112.
  
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    AUBIO 260 - Principles of Genetics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2) Mendelian inheritance and its cytological features including the molecular and cellular basis for the transmission of hereditary characteristics. Topics that are emphasized include microbial genetics, cytoplasmic inheritance, linkage and genetic mapping, DNA as genetic material, gene action, and the genetic code. Prerequisite: AUBIO 111.
  
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    AUBIO 274 - Microbiology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Introduction to the prokaryotic and eukaryotic members of the microbial world. Microbiological diversity will be examined by comparing cellular morphology, structure and metabolism. Topics include how to grow and study microbes, classification approaches and problems, control of microbial growth, pathogenesis and microbial ecology. Prerequisite: AUBIO 111 and 112.
  
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    AUBIO 280 - Biochemistry: Proteins, Enzymes and Energy


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The structure and function of proteins and enzymes and the structure, function and metabolism of carbohydrates. The structure and function of lipids, nucleic acids, and amino acids are introduced. The course focuses on how enzymes catalyze the oxidation of carbohydrates and how the cell conserves this energy in a useful chemical form. Prerequisites: AUBIO 111 and AUCHE 250. Notes: Formerly part of AUBIO 380. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 280 and AUCHE 280.
  
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    AUBIO 315 - Advanced Biological Analysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Application of statistical and informatics methods for analysis of biological datasets (e.g., plant, bird and bat communities) using both univariate and multivariate techniques. Students will also develop critical skills in research design, organization and interpretation of data, and written and oral communication skills. Course also includes data collection during a short field trip. Prerequisites AUBIO 253 and AUSTA 215.
  
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    AUBIO 318 - Directed Reading I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Supervised library research project. Prerequisites: Third-year standing, *6 in Biology at the 200 level. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUBIO 319 - Directed Studies I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3) Supervised laboratory or field research project. Prerequisites: Third-year standing, *6 in Biology at the 200 level. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUBIO 323 - Plant Biology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Comparative survey of the anatomy, morphology, function, life cycles, and evolutionary features of algae and non-vascular and vascular plants. Taxonomic and environmental considerations are also presented. Prerequisite: AUBIO 112.
  
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    AUBIO 334 - Field Studies in Environmental Science and Ecology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, variable) A 3-week field course that provides students an opportunity to develop skills in research and study design in the field of Environmental Science and Ecology. Students will live in a field camp to allow them to fully immerse themselves in their research projects, which could cover the range of ecology, botany, geography, environmental science, and/or environmental studies. Course content also includes instruction in key aspects of conservation biology and resource management. Prerequisites: AUSTA 215 and AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120 and one of AUGEO 218, AUGEO 230, AUENV 252, AUBIO 253. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 334, AUENV 334 and AUGEO 334.
  
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    AUBIO 336 - Histology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Systematic and sequential consideration of fundamental cytology, the normal histology of the basic tissues, and the embryological development and microscopic organization of the major mammalian organs and organ systems. Emphasis is placed on the light- and electron-microscopic features of cells and tissues with direct correlation of structure and function. Prerequisites: AUBIO 230. Notes: AUBIO 395 is recommended as a pre or corequisite.
  
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    AUBIO 338 - Developmental Biology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Development of complex organisms. Emphasis is on the interactions between cells and their environment that determine cell survival, gene activation and deactivation; and how specific cell and tissue structures and functions are selected. Developmental processes common to plants and animals are identified. Prerequisites: AUBIO 230 and 260.
  
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    AUBIO 350 - Conservation Theory and Biodiversity in Tropical Systems


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Introduction to the basic concepts of conservation biology. The scope of conservation biology and levels of biodiversity are explored, as are aspects of tropical ecology related to conservation. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253 and consent of the instructor(s) based on successful completion of the selection process. Note: This course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUBIO 459 or AUENV 459. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 350 and AUENV 350.
  
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    AUBIO 351 - Biogeography


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Analysis of the spatial patterns of biotic systems and species. The course examines their past and present distribution patterns in the context of biological and ecological processes and human impacts. The course employs several methods of analysis, including geographic information systems. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 351 and AUGEO 351. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUBIO 354 - Freshwater Ecology and Management


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) Introduction to the biological, chemical and physical features of freshwater ecosystems, and how they relate to ecological processes in and adjacent to aquatic systems. The course will examine the role of ecological patterns in lakes, ponds, rivers and streams, with an emphasis on freshwater systems and their management in western Canada. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 354, AUENV 354, and AUGEO 354. The course requires participation in a field trip. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUBIO 355 - Ecological Dynamics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Addresses ecological processes at different spatial scales. Includes demography, population and meta-population dynamics of plants and animals across a broad range of ecosystems, community ecology and ecosystem functioning. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253.
  
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    AUBIO 371 - Immunology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) An introduction to the structure and function of the immune system. Topics will include the generation of B and T cell receptor diversity, antigens and antibodies, clonal selection and expansion, MHC restriction, self tolerance, cytokines and leukocyte trafficking. Discussion of infectious disease, vaccines, and immunity will be used to synthesize these topics into a unified conceptual framework. Prerequisites: AUBIO 274.
  
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    AUBIO 381 - Biochemistry: Intermediary Metabolism


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Structure, function, and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids at the level of the cell and organs. Prerequisites: AUBIO 280 or AUCHE 280. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 381 and AUCHE 381.
  
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    AUBIO 388 - Biochemistry Laboratory


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3) Laboratory course in biochemical techniques. Prerequisites: AUBIO 280 or AUCHE 280.
  
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    AUBIO 389 - Molecular Biology of the Gene


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Survey of current knowledge and approaches in the area of structure, expression, and regulation of eukaryote genes and genomes. Topics include gene isolation and characterization, gene structure and replication, and transcription and translation processes and their regulation. Recombinant DNA technology and its applications are also introduced. Prerequisite: AUBIO 260.
  
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    AUBIO 390 - Animal Behaviour


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Introduction to key concepts and methods in animal behaviour. Both mechanistic and evolutionary points of view are considered. Topics include genetics, developmental processes, learning, neurophysiological aspects, orientation, communication, foraging and habitat use, social behaviour, parental care and mating. Prerequisite: AUBIO 112, 260 and AUSTA 215.
  
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    AUBIO 394 - Comparative Invertebrate Zoology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Functional anatomy and life cycles of the major invertebrate taxa. Prerequisite: AUBIO 112.
  
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    AUBIO 395 - Vertebrate Form and Function


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Study of the structure, function, and diversity of vertebrates. Prerequisite: AUBIO 112.
  
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    AUBIO 397 - Vertebrate Physiology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Review of the general concepts in animal physiology with an emphasis on structure and function and their adaptive significance to the animal in its environment. Physical, chemical, and functional aspects of animal cells and cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, osmoregulatory, endocrine, and nervous systems are considered. Bioelectric and contractility phenomena are also included. Prerequisites: AUBIO 230. Note: AUBIO 395 is recommended as a pre or corequisite.
  
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    AUBIO 411 - History and Theory of Biology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Overview of historical progression in the biological sciences and their associated development in relation to prevailing philosophical, social, and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: AUBIO 260; one of AUBIO 338, 438: one of AUBIO 323, 394, 395; fourth-year standing.
  
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    AUBIO 412 - Selected Topics in Biological Science


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) In-depth study of an advanced topic in Biology. Prerequisites: Vary according to topic; third-year standing.
  
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    AUBIO 413 - Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Ecology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) In-depth study of evolutionary processes in natural populations of plants and animals. Selected topics for lectures and seminars address contemporary questions about natural selection, adaptation, speciation, biogeography and the evolution of interaction among species. Prerequisites: AUBIO 253 and *3 of AUBIO at the 300 level or a cross-listed AUENV or AUGEO equivalent.
  
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    AUBIO 418 - Directed Reading II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0) Supervised library research project. Prerequisites: Third-year standing, *6 in Biology at the 200 level. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUBIO 419 - Directed Studies II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3) Supervised laboratory or field research project. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An "Application for Individual Study" must be completed and approved before registration in the course.
  
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    AUBIO 438 - Evolutionary Development Biology


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Comparative study of the developmental processes of different organisms in an attempt to determine their ancestral relationships and how developmental processes evolved. Topics include the origin and evolution of embryonic development; how modifications of development and developmental processes lead to the production of novel features; the role of developmental plasticity in evolution; the origin of biodiversity; and the developmental basis of homology. Prerequisite: AUBIO 338.
  
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    AUBIO 459 - Field Studies in Tropical Ecology and Conservation


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0 2 weeks field work) Field course that addresses problems of biodiversity and conservation in tropical environments. The student participates in field workshops, and designs and conducts their own field project to answer questions related to ecological and biological conservation. Prerequisite: AUBIO 350 or AUENV 350, and consent of the instructors based on successful completion of the selection process. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 459 and AUENV 459. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.
  
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    AUBIO 475 - Pathogenic Mechanisms of Microorganisms


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Examination of the pathogenic mechanisms used by bacteria, fungi, and protists that cause human diseases. Pathogens will be compared with a focus on the method of entry, colonization and invasion of host tissue used by various microbes and the microbial factors required to cause infection and disease. Epidemiological approaches, antimicrobials and antibiotic resistance will also be presented. Prerequisites: AUBIO 274.

Augustana Faculty - Chemistry: Undergraduate

Department of Science
Augustana Faculty

  
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    AUCHE 110 - General Chemistry I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) A general introduction to chemistry. Topics include atomic structure; bonding and bonding theories; periodic trends; states of matter and intermolecular forces; and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 30 and Mathematics 30-1.
  
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    AUCHE 112 - General Chemistry II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Continuation of AUCHE 110. Topics include thermodynamics, free energy, equilibria, acid-base chemistry, buffers, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisite: AUCHE 110.
  
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    AUCHE 211 - Communicating Chemistry


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) An introductory course in communicating chemical data and chemistry information using a variety of different media and targeting diverse audiences. Topics to be discussed include information and scientific literacy, locating and evaluating appropriate sources of literature, written and oral communication of scientific information, strategies for writing a scientific paper, strategies for orally presenting scientific data and strategies for constructing a scientific poster. All topics are taught from a chemistry perspective with a focus on chemistry-based course content. Prerequisite: AUCHE 112
  
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    AUCHE 220 - Analytical Chemistry


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Theoretical and practical aspects of chemical analysis. Topics include gravimetry, titrimetry, separations, acid-base equilibria, chromatography, and spectrophotometry. Examples emphasize the utility and limitations of analytical techniques. Prerequisite: AUCHE 112. Recommended corequisite: AUMAT 110 or 116.
  
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    AUCHE 222 - Instrumental Analysis


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) Study of the theory and practice of instrumental methods of analysis. Topics include atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy, fluorometry, liquid and gas chromatography, physical separations, and electrochemical methods. Examples include the analysis of chemicals with environmental importance. Prerequisite: AUCHE 220. Recommended corequisite: AUMAT 110 or 116.
  
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    AUCHE 230 - Inorganic Chemistry I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) An introduction to inorganic chemistry. Topics include: the electronic structure of atoms, bonding models and Molecular Orbital Theory, symmetry and point groups, donor-acceptor chemistry, structure and bonding of ionic solids and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisite: AUCHE 112.
  
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    AUCHE 232 - Inorganic Chemistry II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3) An extension of AUCHE 230 with an emphasis on the structure, bonding, reactivity and characterization of transition metal complexes. Topics include: isomerism, stereochemistry, Crystal Field and Ligand Field Theory, ligand substitution, redox chemistry, electronic spectra, magnetochemistry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisite: AUCHE 230.
  
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    AUCHE 250 - Organic Chemistry I


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3) An introduction to bonding and functionality in organic compounds. Mechanistic approach to solving problems will be emphasized, with discussion of the reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides. The three-dimensional structure of molecules and the concept of stereochemistry will be examined. Infrared spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy will be applied in both the lecture and the lab. Prerequisite: AUCHE 110; AUCHE 112 is recommended.
  
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    AUCHE 252 - Organic Chemistry II


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3) Continuation of AUCHE 250, again emphasizing a mechanist approach. The chemistry of alcohols, conjugated unsaturated systems, aromatic rings, carbonyl-containing compounds, organic reduction-oxidation reactions, and beta-dicarbonyl compounds will be discussed. Carbohydrate chemistry will be introduced as a way to explore many concepts in a biochemical context. Prerequisite: AUCHE 250.
  
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    AUCHE 277 - Introduction to Relativity and Quantum Mechanics


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Special relativity; photons and matter waves; Bohr atom model; Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle; Schrödinger equation; one-dimensional systems; hydrogen atom; spin; Pauli Exclusion Principle; many-electron atoms; molecules. Prerequisites: AUCHE 112, AUMAT 112, and AUPHY 120. Corequisite: AUMAT 211 is recommended. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCHE 277, AUPHY 260.
  
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    AUCHE 279 - Physical Chemistry


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Study of the principles and concepts of physical chemistry. Topics include the laws of thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibria, surface chemistry, chemical kinetics and catalysis and spectroscopy and photochemistry. Prerequisites: AUCHE 112 and AUMAT 110 or 116.
  
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    AUCHE 280 - Biochemistry: Proteins, Enzymes and Energy


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) The structure and function of proteins and enzymes and the structure, function and metabolism of carbohydrates. The structure and function of lipids, nucleic acids, and amino acids are introduced. The course focuses on how enzymes catalyze the oxidation of carbohydrates and how the cell conserves this energy in a useful chemical form. Prerequisites: AUBIO 111 and AUCHE 250. Notes: Formerly part of AUCHE 380. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 280 and AUCHE 280.
  
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    AUCHE 320 - Analytical Chemistry III


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Theory and application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Prerequisite: AUCHE 222.
  
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    AUCHE 324 - Research Techniques in Analytical Chemistry


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3) An advanced analytical laboratory course utilizing spectroscopic, chromatographic and electroanalytical techniques. The emphasis will be on the application of the instrumental techniques for the analysis and identification of unknown samples. Prerequisites: AUCHE 320.
  
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    AUCHE 330 - Organometallic Chemistry


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) An introduction to organometallic chemistry. Topics include: the 18 electron rule, transition metal complexes of hydrides, phosphines, carbonyls, olefins, alkynes, polyolefins, cyclopentadienyl and related cyclic pi-ligands, metal-carbon sigma- and multiple bonds, organometallic reactions and related mechanisms, catalysis and industrial applications. Prerequisite: AUCHE 232.
  
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    AUCHE 341 - Introduction to Environmental Chemistry


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) This course serves as an introduction to the chemical processes responsible for natural environmental phenomena and anthropogenic environmental sampling, climate change, pollution, waste management, fossil fuels and alternative energy technologies, toxic organic compounds and the principles of green chemistry. Prerequisites: AUCHE 112, third year standing, AUCHE 220 recommended.
  
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    AUCHE 350 - Organic Chemistry III


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0) Continuation of the foundation laid in AUCHE 250 and 252, considering in greater depth and breadth topics, including: reactions of carbonyl compounds, conjugate additions, and 1H-NMR. Radical reactions, retrosynthesis and total synthesis (both overall strategy and key reactions) will also be explored. Prerequisite: AUCHE 252.
  
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    AUCHE 360 - Advanced Synthetic Laboratory


    ★ 3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3) This course is a guided-inquiry laboratory course that is focused on the development of modern organic and inorganic synthetic skills and techniques. Students will gain hands-on experience in researching, developing and implanting synthetic methodologies and analyzing experimental results. In addition, student will strengthen their communication skills through oral and written assignments. Prerequisites: AUCHE 232 and AUCHE 252. AUCHE 210 recommended.
 

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